Unbroken Analysis

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Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand Hillenbrand is known as one of the best authors in the world, has written bestselling books such as Unbroken and Seabiscuit. Unbroken is a 2010 book of non-fiction describing the story of Resilience, Survival, and Redemption during the WWII. In other words, Unbroken is termed as the biography of Louis Zamperini, a WWII hero and a former star of Olympic who endured a plane crack in the Pacific. The book describes how he drifted on a raft for 47 days and lasted two years of imprisonment in the Japanese camps. This paper will describe the contexts and the analysis of the “Unbroken” book. Historical Context Unbroken mainly emphases on the conflict that emerged during the WWII in the Pacific. The author narrates how…show more content…
The physical effects of war were debilitating, longer lasting and deadly to the victim. The emotional injuries, on the other hand, were extremely insidious. This was the era before the knowledge about PTSD was little, thus many veterans suffered from the unique and stranger experiences to most individuals (Hillenbrand 30). On the other hand, the Berlin Olympics of 1936 furthermore represents an important role in the book. In the Olympics, Jesse Owens, an African American athlete won the four medals thus defying the racist beliefs of the Nazis that the blacks were inferior. Finally, the World War two can be termed as the darkest and evil period in the history of man. However, this book, “Unbroken” has briefly explained the events that led to this war, the destruction of Nagasaki and Hiroshima by the atomic bomb (Hillenbrand 33). It also comprises a quote from the Prisoner of war who thinks that in most cases, “the end always justifies the means”, similarly to what happened in the WWII. Cultural…show more content…
Zamparini bears much pain that would actually (broken) other people. Nonetheless, he is not destroyed (is unbroken) by all the experiences (Hillenbrand 71). For instance, as a prisoner, the Japanese military tried to torment so as to “break him” but he persevered. Also, the life of post-war was much a struggle and could have destroyed him but he managed to realize the spiritual power which saved him (Hillenbrand 73). Therefore, the (Unbroken) idea reflects how Louie was affected by the war and post-war life but he remained firm. Louie arises as (Unbroken), thoughtful of the suffering and pain endured including the memories of this treatment as part of his life, but are not ones which describe
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