Examples Of Intolerance In The Book Night

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Elie Wiesel, a male Holocaust survivor, once said: “The opposite of love is not hate, it's indifference” and “Indifference, to me, is the epitome of evil.” During the Holocaust, over eleven million innocent people were killed because of the hate and intolerance the Nazis had for them. Many people fight against the injustice of the Nazi party and without them hundreds more people could have died. Intolerance and hate were some main causes of the Holocaust, and the fight against it is shown in The Book Thief, The Whispering Town, Paper Clips, and Eva’s Story. In The Book Thief, Liesel and her foster family fight against hate and intolerance by sheltering a Jewish boy named Max. Keeping Max in their basement is risky, and the Hubermanns know …show more content…

In the book, a girl named Annett and her parents hide a Jewish woman and her son, Carl, in their cellar until a fishing boat can take them to Sweden, a safe country not impacted by the Holocaust. Before it is time for them to leave, Annett’s father tells her that their visitors have to leave that night even though it’s really cloudy. One of the ways Annett resists the Nazi’s hate and intolerance is by getting everyone in her village to stand in their doorways and whisper directions to the family so they know where to go to arrive at the boat safely. In the book, this is shown with: “‘Papa, what if people stood in their doorways and used their voices to guide our friends to the boat?’ I suggested” (Elvgren 15). Because Annett came up with this idea, the Jews that her family was sheltering in their house were able to get to the boat and travel safely to Sweden. Because of hate and intolerance many Jews had to go into hiding, but a community in The Whispering Town fight against it by guiding two Jews to …show more content…

One example of this is when Mutti, Eva’s mother, gives a box full of talcum powder and jewels to a Gestapo officer to set the Restimas free. As the author says: “‘Mutti has made a deal with the Gestapo. She is going to give them our box of talcum powder, and they will let the Restimas go free.’ He [the Gestapo officer] undid the bottom of the container, and out fell both the powder and all the jewelry that Mutti had hidden there…” (Schloss 42-43). Even though Eva’s family didn’t get set free, all the other Restimas were set free all thanks to Mutti and her fight against the repulsion and injustice of the Holocaust. Another example of the fight in Eva’s Story is when again, Mutti, saves Eva from going to the gas chambers in Auschwitz by making her put on one of her adult-looking hats and coats as they get out of the transportation train. Although it was challenging, Eva and her family still found a way to fight hate and intolerance by Mutti selling her jewels and Eva putting on her mom’s clothes to save

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