Macbeth Power And Corruption Analysis

1025 Words5 Pages
A common theme in Macbeth is that power and corruption come hand in hand. Frequently, people with power lie and go against the better welfare of their people. Tragic hero, Macbeth, and political mastermind, Joseph Stalin, end up corrupted by trying to control and obtain power. They both wanted power and superiority so they did everything they could to get higher and higher on the totem pole. The tragedy play Macbeth by William Shakespeare tells the story of a hero’s journey to kingship. Macbeth begins the play as a war hero in the army of King Duncan. He was advised by three witches that he would soon become the Thane of Cawdor and eventually the King of Scotland. He is then named Thane of Cawdor since the previous one was being executed for betrayal. That day, Macbeth writes to his wife, Lady Macbeth, to tell her about the prophecy.…show more content…
The more Macbeth kills, the more blood-thirsty he becomes. Lady Macbeth, who had the idea to kill, starts sleepwalking and imagining blood on her hands. She regrets her decisions immensely and kills herself due to the guilt. Macbeth, depressed about his wife’s death, fights in a battle and comes face to face with Macduff. Macduff assassinated Macbeth and Malcom is crowned the King of Scotland. “Fair is foul, and foul is fair” (Act 1, Scene 1, Line 12) is a quote said by the three witches in the beginning of the play. It explains that what is fair or pretty will become ugly or what is ugly will become pretty. Macbeth was once fair and innocent but corruption turned him ugly by the end of the play. The witches gave hints of what's to come with that quote. By the end, Macbeth was becoming more of a megalomaniac. Lady Macbeth was first more corrupt than he but later, their roles change. Macbeth is a good example to show that power and corruption come hand in hand.
Joseph Stalin was an authority figure in control of the Soviet Union and famous for his brutal leadership. Stalin ruled by striking fear and terror into the hearts

More about Macbeth Power And Corruption Analysis

Open Document