Parent Child Relationships In Frankenstein

1648 Words7 Pages
In Frankenstein, Mary Shelley made it clear that parenting is essential in the development of child. Specifically, the novel presents a central theme concerning the negative impact on children from the absence of nurturing and motherly love. To demonstrate this view, Shelly focuses on Victor Frankenstein’s experimenting with nature, which results in the life of his creature, or child. Parents are expected to raise their children with love, proper morals and ethics, but in this case it is portrayed when a child is neglected it leads to havoc, violence, or disruption within their lives or vice versa. It is expected that parents demonstrate both love and affection towards their infant. However, there are instances in which some parents neglect…show more content…
When I mingled with other families I distinctly discerned how peculiarly fortunate my lot was, and gratitude assisted the development of filial love” (39). This is exceptionally ironic because he had such helpful and caring parents but couldn't provide the same for his creation, which was essentially his child. When Victor sees what he has created, he is immediately repulsed by it, ”...now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart. Unable to endure the aspect of the being I had created, I rushed out of the room, and continued a long time traversing my bedchamber, unable to compose my mind to sleep” (58). The Creation was abandoned from the start just because he wasn't the best looking, which clearly shows Victor favors beauty over value. Which is clearly displayed when he refers to creation as “it” (102), a “vile insect” (102), “wretch” (77), and a “filthy daemon” (77) multiple times. Victor directly told his creation, “Begone! Relieve me from the sight of your detested form” (104). Distinctly displaying conflict because he tells the creation to get out of his life constantly mistreating and…show more content…
“The father of Safie had been the cause of their ruin” (125). This heavily displays conflict because it is Safie’s father against Felix, Agatha, De Lacey, as well as Safie herself. Safie’s father promised here hand in marriage to Felix, “The turk quickly percieved the impression that his daughter made on the heart of Felix and endeavored to secure him more entirely in his interests by the promise of her hand in marriage” (126). This is another prime example of how Safie’s father lied and used Felix to his advantage to help him escape from prison. Extending upon Safie’s fathers lie, “He loathed the idea that his daughter should be united with a christian” (127). This characterizes Safie’s father as shrewd man who is only looking out for his own back. “Safie was always gay and happy” (121)… “Animated smiles of the charming Arabian” (123). Safie was always a happy and generous woman, but due to the commotion her father caused… ruined the reputation of the De Lacey family. She chose to run away from her father after all the havoc he caused escaping from prison, in search for Felix after she learnt his filthy intentions. She joined Felix after her search, she was constantly on the move after the sighting of the creation… leading to havoc and
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