Religion In Dracula

921 Words4 Pages
Bram Stokers Dracula is a novel that can be presented and interpreted in a number of different ways. Throughout the story, there are several themes that can be identified, such as womens rights, the importance of teamwork, and even the struggle between good and evil. However, considering Dracula to be a religious novel is quite debatable. Because of the several references and ties to religious thoughts and beliefs in the novel, Dracula should in fact be considered a religious novel, as the religious objects in the story are pivotal to the success of the protagonists, and Stoker is meaning to strengthen the power of these beliefs of the townsfolk.

It is important to consider Dracula a religious novel because of the importance
…show more content…
As stated earlier in first chapter of the story, the townsfolk knew what was happening from the beginning. They knew that holy objects, such as the crucifix, had the potential of warding off evil demonic entities, such as vampires. Their knowledge of the situation could in part be due to the fact that they likely lived in Transylvania for the majority of their lives, and experience is key when it comes to knowledge and wisdom. Because Harker was the first to come into contact with the townspeople and he knew about their superstitions, it is a surprise that he did not attempt to return to Transylvania and ask for their help. They could have been of great assistance due to their prior knowledge that Dracula was a vampire himself.

The religious nature of Dracula was a driving factor behind the events that unfolded in the plot. Mainly through that of Dr. Van Helsing, the holy objects used by the characters helped ward off the damnation of the vampires, as they would recoil and refuse to go to places that contained these objects. This effectiveness of the objects prove that the author was not trying to mock the superstitions, but to prove them

More about Religion In Dracula

Open Document