Slavery During The Pre-Civil War

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Life of a Slave Slaves in the pre-Civil War time, their lives wasn 't theirs. A slave’s life was hard and they barely had any fun. They had numerous things to be afraid of and the Southern states had a barely enough reason that most likely wouldn 't fly by in this generation to justify that slavery was a right thing to do. A slave always had to work that they had to do. So their lives was very harsh and rough. They had to be out in fields sometimes too. Children and elderly people were not exempt from these tasks. Since slaves had barely enough time for themselves, they made music, told stories, and prayed. If they did not get the work that was given to them done, they would probably get beaten. There did not have to be a specific reason of why slaves were beaten or even given more work individually. Owners could do with their property what they please.Slaves got the minimum amount of necessities. Because of this, during their minimal amount of…show more content…
Southern states justified slavery by using many points. They used the economy, history, religion, legality, social, and humanitarianism. One reason was that if all slaves were freed, there would be a very high unemployment. Another reason the South had was that having slaves would boost the economy. Southern states defended slavery by using history:” Slavery has been legal for a long time before now, so it is a natural thing to do.” On the other hand, the main point was that slaves planting and picking cotton would heavily boost the economy. There were plenty of other reasons justifying why slavery should be legal, but these were some main points. African-American people during pre-civil war times had a harsh life. Many black people during this time just mainly worked all of their lives non-stop. Thinking back, if slavery still existed now with all of this technology it would be even more wrong than it was before. They were overpowered people and they were probably in danger their whole lives. This was the life of a
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