Technology In Fahrenheit 451, By Ray Bradbury

1265 Words6 Pages
Every year, thousands of pedestrians are injured as they walk in cities. Some researchers say 1 out of 10 of those injuries are caused by a “distracting mobile device such as a phone or portable music player” (“Walking While Looking down”). Undoubtedly, the risk for injury in a crowded city increases greatly when technology is a distraction. In this day and age, technology is all over the place, no matter where you are in a moments time, technology is all around you. Lots of times technology is used positively, but more often than not, technology is not used wisely and safely. This subject is certainly up for debate. The entire world needs to join as one and understand that if the human race continues down the technological path it…show more content…
Readers saw this clearly in the novel Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury. Ray Bradbury depicts a society that is completely brainwashed by technology. “Technology is king of all people,” is a reality in this novel. Robotic hounds killing people, walls of television consuming entire lives, and as a result of these disastrous decisions by the people, education is just an afterthought. A thing of the past. If the negative repercussions of technology are not taken care of soon, we will surely be living in the horrid life of Guy Montag in Fahrenheit 451 a few decades from now. In our world today, dependence on technology is extremely prevalent. Lives are becoming bombarded with electrical gadgets. The negative effects of technology have become obvious over the years. Since 2010, “pedestrian injuries caused by cell phone use are up 35 percent, according to numbers from hospital emergency rooms” (“Walking While Looking down”). Clearly, people are choosing electronics over their own safety. In 2012 alone, 4,700 people walking in big cities were killed (“Walking While Looking down”). This surprising number is due to the fact that men and women are becoming greatly distracted by their handheld devices. Social…show more content…
In the novel, the students have “an hour of TV class, an hour of basketball or baseball or running” (Bradbury, 27). Clarisse, Montag’s friend in the beginning of the novel, further explains how the students “never ask questions, or at least most don't; they just run the answers at you, bing, bing, bing” (27). Part of being human is asking questions. Asking how something occurs or why it occurs enriches the human brain. In Fahrenheit 451, the citizens never acknowledge information because they are brainwashed by the advanced technology. Clarisse explains how in school, the students have branded her as antisocial (27). Clarisse continues to say how others say she does not mix, “it's so strange. I'm very social indeed. It all depends on what you mean by social, doesn't it? Social to me means talking to you [Montag] about things like this… But I don't think it’s social to get a bunch of people together and then not let them talk’ ’’ (27). Clearly, Clarisse is an outsider from the rest of her classmates, but to call Clarisse antisocial is absurd. At school, Clarisse did not learn much because instead of there being teachers who taught in front of the class, class was run by televisions that launched videos and movies daily. This is a haunting fact and a daunting realization that in only a few decades, young lives may be
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