The Beginning Of An Affair By Frederick Douglass Rhetorical Devices

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Title: “The Beginning of an Affair” Reader Response: In this chapter, Douglass speaks with high remarks for his new home in Baltimore, and describes the department from colonel Lloyd’s planation. He mentions leaving Colonel Lloyd’s plantation as a joyful event, there was ecstasy running through him. Baltimore is subtly hinted to be a better place by the mention that someone is making trousers for him to wear there. “For the people in Baltimore are very cleanly.” He says this to help the readers understand that Baltimore being a nicer place could mean a better opportunity for Douglass. Douglass concludes the chapter by remarking his first impressions after stepping of the boat. Rhetorical Device: Sentence: “It was a new and strange sight …show more content…

Despite still being a slave Douglass is ecstatic to be on this new plantation, with a new master and mistress. The use of this rhetorical device also washes away the idea that this new home could be like his last. By using such positive words he shows gratitude towards the setting and new life. Douglass considers his transfer a gift of providence. Figurative Device: Sentence: “My feet have been so cracked with the frost that the pen with which I am writing might be laid in gashes.” Douglass’ uses of imagery helps the reader’s paint of picture of what living on Colonel Lloyd’s plantation can do to a slave. This sentence not only gives us insight into the physical aspect of being a slave, but also the entire summary of living on one planation. You can live on one plantation for years and at the end only remember the brutal cracked feet. He continues to describe hell on the plantation by saying he was kept almost naked, no stockings, no shoes, no jacket, and no trousers. The imagery used gives us readers an almost unmatchable experience in understanding the life a slave went through. Reading Log Chapter 6 Title: “The Beginning of the …show more content…

He speaks by saying that a city slave is almost always feed and clothes properly. He also talks a lot about his mistress, and how she tried to teach him to read. In this chapter Douglass details his master explaining to his wife why a slave cannot be taught to read. From here Douglass has a goal of teaching himself to read, he realizes the white man is very fearful of a slave holding that power. Douglass also speaks of this mistreatment of his neighbor slaves, how they are emaciated. And also how the mistress of the neighboring slaves abuses her power and whips them almost hourly. Rhetorical Device: Sentence: “Her face was made of heavenly smiles.” Douglass uses a hyperbole to exaggerate the truth of the expression of his mistress. Douglass describes his new mistress by saying she was a woman of the kindest of hearts and finest feelings. Throughout the chapter he praises her. However, her face is not literally made of heavenly smiles. Douglass uses the rhetorical device to symbolize the draft difference from his old plantation to his city life as a slave. The description of a kind mistress gives Douglass hope in a better life, and having a kind mistress also helps him realize his true passion as a slave. Figurative Device: Sentence: “The head, neck, and shoulders of Mary were literally cut into

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