Theme Of Grandison And Huckleberry Finn

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Mark Twain and Charles W. Chesnutt wrote about many similar topics that were based in the 1800 's. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Twain and The Passing of Grandison by Chesnutt are examples of this. The themes of these two stories tie together by the way that the main character is a boy trying to figure things out on his own, the two boys are traveling through most of the story with a slave, and both stories have an ironic twist dealing with the slave that they travel with at the end of the story. In the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huckleberry Finn or Huck for short is the main character. He comes from a background of not having any parents and because of this he is very independent. Huck tries to search for answers about life through…show more content…
Both Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and The Passing of Grandison with an ironic twist to things. At the end of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Huck is at a plantation trying to help Jim escape from being a slave there. Tom Sawyer and Huck devise this master plan to rescue him. Most of the plan if not all of it is made by Tom which means that things are going to be far more difficult then what they should actually be. They end up rescuing Jim, but during the rescue Tom gets shot in the leg. After all of that commotion and Tom being shot they Huck finds out that Tom knew before they risked their lives to save Jim that Jim had been free the entire time and that there was no reason for them to try to break him out when they had the ability to free him without all of the drama. In The Passing of Grandison there is three parts of irony to the ending. First, is the fact that Grandison returns to Colonel Owens ' plantation after Dick had taken him all the way to Canada just to free him from slavery. It confused Dick because Grandison even made up a lie about how he did not run away but that he was kidnapped by some people up north. The second part to the ironic ending is that the Colonel believed that all of his slaves especially Grandison were so loyal that they would never run away from the plantation, but come to find out Grandison only came back to free his family from slavery. He had used his opportunity of being up north to find safe passage for his entire family to escape with him. The third part of the ironic ending is the fact that Charity, the girl Dick wanted to be with, decides to be with Dick not because he freed a slave, but because she thought that he was so reckless that he she should marry him to look after him. Both of the stories had epic ironic endings and left the readers wondering what Huck and Dick were thinking in the

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