To Kill A Mockingbird Police Equality

1852 Words8 Pages
The relevancy of the book “To Kill a Mockingbird” has not changed a lot from the time it was first published to today. This book was published in a time period where racism was a large issue. In “To kill a Mockingbird” we follow three young children, Scout, Jem and Dill through their rude awakening to the real racist word in Maycomb. With the children seeing how wrong the treatment of African Americans was it became very obvious to them how the mistreatment impacted the African American community. While on the other hand the people with racist beliefs have never known anything different, African Americans were subhuman to them. So, as the book is told from the children 's point of view the reader really gets to see the negative impact of this…show more content…
In today’s society racism is still present, even though some try and do remain blind to it. The “old fashioned” beliefs are still present in our generation in our law enforcement, fellow workers and even close friends. We see in the news all the time as law enforcement discriminate against African Americans like we read in “To Kill a Mockingbird. People are still being discriminated because of their skin color and it still is in severe accounts similar to Tom’s case and death. Tom was shot 17 times, an extreme overkill and can be considered police brutality. Police brutality is something often heard about in the news, and what exactly is it? “Police brutality is the use of excessive and/or unnecessary force by police when dealing with civilians”(merriam webster dictionary). So, Tom’s death was definitely unnecessary force with 17 shots when only a few could’ve had the same effect. Nowadays police are still using excessive force just this year in September. A “16-year-old black teenager was tackled by multiple officers after allegedly jaywalking in a bus-only lane early one morning. A video of the arrest shows an unnamed officer pressing a baton against him, as the boy screams “get off me.” The officer hits the boy twice with the baton and tells him to get on the ground. Seconds later, four more officers tackle the child to the ground and handcuff him”(The Worst Cases of Police Brutality in September). This excessive force for jaywalking is unnecessary and…show more content…
As long as racism and cases such as the ones above still happening there will alway be a need for books that teach non racist views and help show young adults that everyone is equal. This book does a great job of showing the terrible actions taken against “niggers and nigger-lovers” from an innocent child’s view. This helps to breakdown the appalling treatment of the African American community to allow people to see the wrong in the actions very clearly. People often find themselves holding a prejudice against others without even realizing it. If we were able to use this book and erase some prejudices pushed onto kids by their parents and therefore creating a more accepting generation by allowing freshmint like us to see the wrongs in people like Mr. Ewell the importance of this book will be manifested. The book could help to teach people like the resource officer, that what they did was wrong and unjust. This book has a strong impact on teenagers and children, and they are the one who have to be taught the difference between someone doing bad, and someone being accused of being bad because of who they are. As we see in “To Kill a Mockingbird” the children are influenced by their parents views as is all children. When “He(Cecil Jacobs) had announced in the schoolyard the day before that Scout Finch 's daddy defended niggers”(pg. 99). This child Cecil Jacobs probably overheard his father talking about Atticus defending Tom Robinson and made a comment
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