Tradition In The Crucible

1367 Words6 Pages
Arthur Miller’s The Crucible strongly portrays the influence of tradition on society. During the Salem Witch trials of the late 1600s, John Proctor tries to stray from the traditional Puritan beliefs, but the Puritans do not accept his deviation. Instead, they persecute him for thinking witches don’t exist, refusing to try to understand him, Tituba, Elizabeth, or Mary Warren. This oppression against the “non-believers” is very similar to the oppression of minority groups today, who are forced to conform to traditions, are demonized for deviance from these traditions, and must be “cleansed” for their wrongdoings. The Crucible effectively demonstrates the demonization of “the other”, and the forcing of minorities to conform to the beliefs of…show more content…
LGB teens tend to suffer much more than heterosexual teens, due to them being a minority and being an easier target for bullying. Consequently, they are “at far greater risk for depression, bullying, and many types of violence than their straight peers” (Hoffman). Being LGB should not affect the level of bullying, yet the mental health of LGB people are still at risk. As a teen questioning my sexuality and growing up, I feel discouraged to explore myself and learn about myself when being different sexually leads to such bullying and ridicule. This is similar to Tituba in The Crucible, in the way that she was bullied for her efforts against witchery. The way that LGB people suffer in heteronormative environments, being bullied for their differences and being emotionally damaged, resembles the bullying of Tituba and Mary Warren, who try to go against the existence of witches, and try to defend their beliefs. Additionally, even with new evidence, much like John Proctor’s reasonings in court, LGB people are still persecuted due to the underlying tradition. Since nonheterosexuality is “not simply a personal charactersitic” and is an “essential component of personal identity” (Mountjoy), it should be accepted and not doubted or scorned. However, just like how John Proctor failed to persuade the judges of the court and the people of Salem, LGB people are demonized for their beliefs and are almost hopeless in being accepted and valued. Nonheterosexuality should be “stud[ied] without fear”, but because of “political restraint” (What), room for understanding and accepting in the media is lost. While Salem, conquered by Puritan beliefs and traditions cannot accept those who deviate from the norm, today’s society cannot accept or understand LGB people, and therefore LGB
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