Examples Of Violence In Frederick Douglass

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Just Versus Unjust Violence: A Rhetorical Analysis of Violence in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and Uncle Tom’s Cabin Frederick Douglass and Harriet Beecher Stowe present slavery in vastly distinct ways. In Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, author Frederick Douglass dives into a grisly world filled with bloodshed and in the middle of it a man willing to do what it takes to be educated and in control of his own person, narrated with the voice of reason. In Uncle Tom’s Cabin, author Harriet Beecher Stowe depicts a variety of characters, their struggle with slavery and religion, their personal relationships, and their deep inner feelings, with no small degree of emotion and sentimentality. Douglass and Stowe’s use of …show more content…

Resolving to fight back against Covey thrusts Douglass into manhood and is the first instance of justified violence seen in the novel: “It rekindled the few expiring embers of freedom, and revived within me a sense of my own manhood...and inspired me again with a determination to be free” (68). Although up to this point the violence described was portrayed as completely unjust and terrible, here the reader is to understand that, for the slave, this type of violence may not only be necessary, but completely justified when attempting to gain …show more content…

Stowe appeals to our emotions and relies on our hearts to express to our heads how wrong the violence of slavery is by making readers empathize with her characters, still acknowledging that although violence is a tool used by those who are evil, it can also be used when necessary for freedom. Both equate slaves taking violence back to use for their own defense as justified, reasonable, and necessary in the fight for freedom and self-ownership. Each display violence as a tool of oppression slaveholders take pleasure in using to keep slaves down and stop them from asserting their rights, intelligence, or power. Although through different means, each appeal to readers to sympathize with the slave and take

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