What Does Fred Shuttlesworth Mean By Civil Disobedience?

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It was September 17, 1957 when Reverend. Fred Shuttlesworth and his family were brutally beaten after traveling miles to a Birmingham high school to improve his daughter’s education and create a better overall life for her. They were ambushed by the Ku Klux Klan when they first arrived. The Klan was very barbaric and they beat the Shuttleworth family with brass knuckles, clubs, fists and chains until they were plastered with bruises. This act of racism affected them greatly by showing them that they were not welcome in neither of these two places: their home that they traveled from and any place in the country they potentially could travel to in the future because of their skin pigment. This event provoked Rev. Shuttlesworth to change how things …show more content…

During the Civil Rights Era, anyone that was of a different skin color did not have an equal chance to speak their mind. Civil disobedience promotes stability in our society and allows African-Americans to speak with the government indirectly without having any government status. This comes into play very well with Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth because he was not educated in any stature of government (Nordheimer). Alongside Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth used civil disobedience to show that he was just as much as a citizen as others that were considered apart of the …show more content…

This means that means the people, with evidence that the government is abusing its constitutionally limited power, have the right to submit a Petition for a Redress (remedy) of the constitutional wrongdoing. Since Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth had a different skin color, the only way he was allowed to act against segregation in a peaceful manner was using civil disobedience. The theory of trying to fight a battle with the same method as the opposing side became a large factor in many citizens testimony in front of a judge when they were imprisoned for disobeying the law. This theory was specifically acquainted with civil disobedience because many activist believed that Although civil disobedience was one of the more commonly used scheme to end segregation, there was also the violent approach. During the Civil Rights Movement, many people resorted towards violence because they found security among the fighting. They noticed that with violence they were creating an outrage in government and they felt as, they had some say in the matter ("Civil Disobedience Is an Appropriate Weapon in the Fight for

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