What Is The Impact On Brown Vs Board Of Education

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Brown vs. The Board of Education: Impact Education is a very important aspect of the current world. In order to be successful, people have to have a good education because it is difficult to see a world without one. Well, in the 1950's, white Americans segregated themselves from African-Americans. They believed that education should be equal even when separate. The case of Brown vs. Board of Education has had a deep effect on the people of the United States and proved that unsegregated education had an educational, social, and political impact on the people of the U.S. In the 1950's, public places were segregated. There were black schools where only colored kids went and white schools where only white children went. Many white schools were …show more content…

"Linda Brown was born in 1943 and lived in the Midwestern town of Topeka, Kan. In 1950, Linda rode the bus five miles to attend the all-black Monroe Elementary School in east Topeka" (source). During this time, many of the African American schools were substandard facilities with out-of-date textbooks and little to no supplies. As a result, Linda's father, Oliver Brown, tried to enroll her in an all-white public school. After his request was denied, Brown fought the unfair decision. The case of Brown v. Board of Education, focused on whether or not the 14th Amendment was violated by denying education in a particular school because of race. In essence, the 14th Amendment states, "A U.S. citizen should not be denied equal protection under the law or the right to life, liberty, or property." This case had to determine whether or not segregation fell under the area of equal protection. "On May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court reached a unanimous decision -- that segregation in public schools was unconstitutional. This statement was the first step in making the U.S. school system more equal. By 1979, Topeka was continuing to allow segregation in its schools. Disturbed by their refusal to comply with the 1954 verdict, Linda Brown sued Topeka for allowing their schools to remain segregated" (source). This action is an example of Linda …show more content…

The original battle for school desegregation became part of broader campaigns for social justice. Fifty years after the Brown decision, the movement has come to include racial and ethnic minorities, women, people with disabilities, and other groups, each demanding equal opportunity. "This Court has long recognized that ‘education...is the very foundation of good citizenship’ Brown v. Board of Education, 347 U.S. 483 (1954). For this reason, the diffusion of knowledge and opportunity through public institutions of higher education must be accessible to all individuals regardless of race or ethnicity" (O'Connor). Since the 1960’s Americans have continued to press for equal educational opportunity. Yet, the meaning of equal opportunity remains controversial. Americans have put their hopes in different and sometimes conflicting approaches to education—further integration, a return to racially separate schools, neighborhood choice, school vouchers, multicultural teaching, or an end to multicultural programs. Through all these years, immigration has continued to change the complexion of classrooms and the expectations of parents and students for American schools. In addition, schools are influenced by where people choose to live and the use of property taxes to finance public education, among other factors. While not consciously racist, these practices tend to perpetuate segregated and unequal public

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