Classical Athens Essays

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    Introduction Classical Athens and Sparta were notably two of Classical Greece’s most impressive poleis. Classical Athens is appreciated for its devotion to philosophy, mathematics, science, and democracy. Whereas, Classical Sparta is recognized for its devotion to war junta. However, their different objectives ensue that the first is recalled for its libertarian ideals and the latter as a fascist city-state. As such, this essay will consider the political systems implemented by Classical Athens and Sparta

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    During the early classical era in Athens and the ancient era of the Han China Dynasty, both societies had striking political organizations and unique government powers that were created to guarantee an ordered and productive society. The systems contrast in that the Han emperor was chosen by heaven that made the dynasty a monarchy whereas Athens gave power to every citizen making the city-state a pure democracy. Despite their differences, the two share in that they used their government powers to

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    termed indistinctness, and ended with the Persians being evicted from Greece for good after the battles of Plataea and Mykale in 479 BCE (2012). This period is then preceded by the Greek Dark Age (c.1100- 750 BCE), which is then followed by the Classical Period (c. 510- 323 BCE), with a documented period of Greek history, with misfortunes, amusements, antiquities, lawful cases and more surviving in the form of mythical and epigraphic sources. These periods gradually resulted in civilization of Greece

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    From 600 b.c.e to 200 c.e 2 empires with distinct political, religious and social structures were formed in Han China and Classical Greece. The Han dynasty differed greatly with Classical Greece in how it governed, what they believed and its social structures which lead to it being able to sustain a much larger population and last for a much large period of time compared to classical; Greece. To begin the Han dynasty continued the centralized government begun by their predecessors the Qin dynasty by

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    plague of Athens as the plague of Thebes that had occurred amidst the Peloponnesian War. He introduces the audience to this catastrophic plague in an exchange between Oedipus and the priest: “Our city reeks with the smoke of burning incense rings with the cries for the Healer and wailing for the dead […] the red waves of death…Thebes is dying” (1-31). According to Thucydides, the plague of Athens was the result of the Peloponnesian War (Capps 35). Therefore, by alluding to the plague of Athens, Sophocles

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    Ancient Greek Hoplites

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    view the history of Greece. Hoplites were the mainstay of ancient Greek armies for several centuries and the way they fought characterised many of the Greek city-states throughout their history. This essay aims to outline the way the hoplites of Classical Athens fought, and how these modes of combat fit in with the prevailing Athenian attitude of andreia, or manly courage. Evidence from ancient and modern sources will be used to evaluate the way hoplites

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    The Classical Period in Ancient Greek history began in 500 BC, when the Greeks first came into conflict with the Persians, and ended in 323 BC, with the death of Alexander the Great. Ancient Greece was made out of many city states all separated by mountainous terrain that made it difficult to travel; therefore each city-state developed independently. One of the most influential city-states was Athens. During this period, Athens was able to transform itself into a successful empire that had a well-developed

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    detailed explanation of the ancient Greeks democratic processes and development as the source was highly detailed it provides for a more reliable source. The source is translated by Sir Frederic G. Kenyon he is a palaeographer and a biblical and classical scholar this means that the source has been translated by a qualified professionally, thus meaning it is more reliable. This source is useful as it provides insight into the laws and rules of ancient Greece at the time this helped in the understanding

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    way a lot. It was not uncommon for a city-state to have two or more forms of government. As such, Athens is a perfect example of a city-state that fall into the aristocratic philosophy, especially before Athenian democracy. It is said that in Athens as well as most of the other city-states, “social prestige and political office were linked to property and military prowess (American School of Classical Studies, n.d.).” To be honest, in my opinion and from all of the research I’ve done, it appears as

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    Sparta has been romanticized in epic novels and colorful films, glorified on stage, and remembered for being the only, truly successful militant based oligarchy the world has ever known. While the Greeks of Athens are heralded for their philosophy, art, economic prowess, architecture and political brilliance, it is Sparta that has captured the imaginations of that time, and for good reason. The Spartan way should not be dismissed for its brutality and xenophobia, but defended for the uniqueness of

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    whether to go to war, the Polis was a very important aspect of the Greek’s lives. In the essay, the functions of the Polis will be discussed along with how the Polis managed to bring about the formation of Democracy, with the Polis of the city of Athens being the main example. The importance of the Polis will be explored through this essay because without the Polis, Democracy as we know it may not have ever formed. In ancient Greece, the Polis was the center of everything, consisting of the main

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    is sweet.” Athens was established in 3000 BC, while Sparta was respectively established in 431 BC. Athens was also referred to as the “birthplace of democracy,” a government system still in use today! Athens was a superior city state over Sparta. This is because of Athenian cultural achievements, government and social climate. Athens had better cultural achievements. “The myths continued to be popular through the centuries, and major public buildings such as the Parthenon at Athens, the Temple

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    were not originally from Athens, but moved there from another location. They also could have been freed saves. They then became citizens, but were not allowed to do certain things the upper class were allowed to do; they were not even allowed to own land or property. On the other hand,all men were, in a way, treated equally. All men were higher in command than women were and had more freedom. Most Metics were found everywhere except for Sparta, but commonly found in Athens. From occupation, to

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    Democracy emanates from a Greek word Demokratia which means the rule of people. In Geek context, it excluded slaves, foreigners and women. It was only men participating however the trend changed (Britannica.com). “Democracy refers to a government of the people, for the people, and by the people.”-Abraham Lincoln. Democracy refers to a system of governance in which the supreme powers are vested in the hands of people and is exercised by them indirectly or directly through a system of representation

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    Compare and contrast monarchy, aristocracy, tyranny, oligarchy, and democracy as forms of government in Ancient Greek city-states. Monarchy: According to Meriam Webster, a monarchy can be a) “undivided rule or absolute sovereignty by a single person” or b) “a nation state having a monarchical government” or c) “a government having a hereditary chief of state with life tenure and powers varying from nominal to absolute”. (Merriam Webster, n.d.). From these definitions, it is clear that a Monarchy

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    The Spartan Empire Spartan Government: An oligarchy system was adopted in Sparta. In the oligarchy system, few people has the power to rule. Sparta also had an assembly just like Athens, but the main decisions were taken by the “Council of Elders” with two kings and twenty-eight other men as its members. The two kings where born within the royal family while the twenty-eight man where elected by the assembly. For men to be elected to the Council of Elders, they had to be at least 60 years old

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    The government in ancient Athens was governed by a radical democratic system from 508-322 B.C. and was very different in its size and how the system allowed all males to participate in the government. The Peloponnesian War effected their government when the oligarchy party overthrew the democracy and replaced it with the modern regime of the Five Thousand. Athenians spent almost 100 year fighting to restore democracy and defeat the Spartans and their allies the Persians. Their style of government

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    In Gorgias, Socrates argues that philosophy is about finding the truth, whereas rhetoric is merely flattery. “Rhetoric is the art of persuasive speaking or writing” (Oxford American Dictionary). Socrates was born near the end of the fourth century B.C. During Socrates's time in the fourth century, rhetoric was a highly regarded art. Plato, a student of Socrates, wrote Gorgias in 380 B.C. In this dialogue, Socrates seeks the true definition of rhetoric and attempts to discover the nature of this art

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    According to TC 7-100, adaptation is defined as; the ability to learn and adjust behaviors based on learning. Adaptation is intimately linked to one’s operational environment and its variables. Adversaries can approach adaptation from two different perspectives: natural and directed. Natural adaptation occurs as an actor (nation-state or non-state) acquires or refines its ability to apply its political, economic, military or informational power. Natural adaptation may be advanced through acquisition

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    Athenian Empire Failure

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    philosophers, however their greed and rapid power was inevitably their demise. The empire initially began in 479 BC, when the greek city states united in order to beat Persia, in the Persian War. Later on, Athens was assigned to command the fleet and therefore the entire Delian league. Before long, Athens controlled

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