Sarcasm Essays

  • Sarcasm In The Importance Of Being Earnest

    1308 Words  | 6 Pages

    clueless, and untrue to their word. In addition, making the girls so stuck on the name of a person highlighted the illogical impression that religious purposes were the only reason women chose to marry a certain man and depicted it as rather foolish. Sarcasm is the primary technique used here as Wilde jokes on the “morals” of women during that period. Once again, Wilde doesn’t provide any solution to his opinion on women or the standards of religious purposes. Instead, he exposes the flaws and leaves

  • John Oliver Satire Analysis

    735 Words  | 3 Pages

    John Oliver’s Sugar - Satire Review “The Average American eats 22 teaspoons of sugar a day, 5 times the proper amount!” This is a quote from the host of “Last Week Tonight” John Oliver in his video over making producers include an ‘added sugar’ slot on product nutrition labels. Consumers should at least get to know what the food we eat contains. The producers are trying to avoid including the “added sugar” on their labels. Their reaction should make you question how much sugar they include in their

  • Why I Want A Wife Essay

    1036 Words  | 5 Pages

    Essay 2 There are countless reasons why a wife makes life so much easier. In the article, “Why I Want a Wife” by Judy Brady she expresses all the reasons why someone would want a wife. All the reasons Brady list is based off the expectations men set for women. Brady made a very effective article considering her stern tone and language. I will explain why I believe “Why I Want a Wife” is a good article due to her captivating title, stern tone, conversational language, the authority Brady has, and

  • A Jury Of Her Peers Symbolism Analysis

    734 Words  | 3 Pages

    Symbolism In “A Jury of Her Peers” Susan Glaspell’s, “A Jury of Her Peers”, took place during the early 1900s and focuses on the issues of sexism and social injustice that still exists today. In this feminist classic, Sheriff Peters and his wife, Mr. Hale and his wife, and the county attorney, Mr. Henderson go to the Wright Household to look for evidence to use against Mrs. Wright. When they arrive, the men disregard everything associated with women, whereas, the women look in debt, put themselves

  • Essay About Mandala

    715 Words  | 3 Pages

    Mandala Essay Growth is a very important part of our life. We can succeed or fail in life, but we try to accomplish our goals. The thorns on a rose are the obstacles we want to pass by as we accomplish our goals in life. A tree can mean growth and a new beginning. As a tree grow, it creates more branches, and the branches symbolizes another generation of your family. A truth can be the best thing that could happen to you, but it can also be the worst. When you tell the truth, you hurt someone for

  • Symbolism In F. Scott Fitzgerald's Pursuit Of The American Dream

    1438 Words  | 6 Pages

    Fitzgerald’s use of symbolism through colours and religious motifs brings out a critique of the pursuit of the American dream, in how such a pursuit of material wealth and status is ultimately consuming. Integral to this essay is our understanding of a relationship between Gatsby’s pursuit of Daisy and Gatsby’s pursuit of status. While both pursuits may be viewed as Gatsby’s goals in life, each may also be understood as a means rather than the end. They seemingly share a circular relationship. Gatsby

  • Narcissus Ovid Analysis

    803 Words  | 4 Pages

    Narcissus Forced to Face a Brutal Reality Was there ever a moment in your childhood when your dreams were shattered and you were forced to come to terms with a harsh reality of the world? In “Narcissus and Echo,” a section of Ovid's epic poem, Metamorphosis, Ovid details a particularly brutal coming-of-age narrative: that of Narcissus. Narcissus is a gorgeous-looking adolescent who attracts the love of men and women alike, but the love of all of his suitors is unrequited because Narcissus turns

  • Hamlet Compare And Contrast Hamlet And Ophelia

    932 Words  | 4 Pages

    The story of Hamlet by William Shakespeare is a story of betrayal, revenge, and intrigue. Hamlet, the title character discovers that his uncle killed his father and married his mother effectively stealing the throne. Hamlet decides he must kill his uncle Claudius as revenge for what he had done. However, as the new king, Hamlet isn't sure how to get to him, so he decides to fake madness, but his plan backfires as Claudius doesn't trust him and makes sure he is always watched. In his fumbled plan

  • Summary Of E. L. Doctorow's Ragtime

    913 Words  | 4 Pages

    New Beginnings Published in 1975, the book Ragtime by E.L. Doctorow is a story of the oppression of different social groups whether it is immigrants or other races. The novel takes place during the period of American history called “The Gilded Age”, coined by the author Mark Twain in 1873 in his novel The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today, referred to gilding, or the application of gold to different surfaces which manifested the homes of the American elite, such as Cornelius Vanderbilt, imitating the homes

  • Conformity And Conformity In Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar

    1017 Words  | 5 Pages

    In our lives, there is, whether we realize it or not, over a million different pivotal moments that lead to different things. At a young age, there is the fine line between becoming an introvert or an extrovert- living our lives in extravagance or happily alone. For Esther Greenwood, her pivotal moment led her to the act of conforming for society, hiding behind the title of magazine editor while contemplating suicide within. In her novel The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath explores the ideas of conformity

  • Persepolis Satire Analysis

    841 Words  | 4 Pages

    Page 70 of Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi depicts the main character of the story, the young Satrapi’s despair at the execution of her uncle Anoosh at the hands of the post-1979 revolution Iranian government. The pretense for his execution is that he is a Russian spy, which, at least from the young main character’s point of view, appears to be blatantly untrue. The author’s shock at this apparently unjustified killing is metaphorically expressed through a confrontation with God, a character in the

  • Macbeth Act 5 Scene 5 Analysis

    808 Words  | 4 Pages

    Shakespeare, in his tragedy, “Macbeth,” illustrates an intriguing narrative in which a man named Macbeth receives equivocations from witches telling him that he will become the king, sending him spiraling down a path of madness and bloodshed. Shakespeare's purpose is to relay the ideas that unchecked ambition leads to a person’s downfall and to elaborate on the vanity of human ambition through the actions of the characters. In act 5, scene 5, he assumes a somber tone through the utilization of alliteration

  • Mary Maloney In Roald Dahl's The Lamb To The Slaughter

    765 Words  | 4 Pages

    Always take caution in dangerous times because not everything is what it seems. The person you trust most might be the enemy. In “The Lamb to the Slaughter” by Roald Dahl, Mary Maloney becomes fazed when her husband tells her he is going to leave her and their unborn child behind. And so, Mary decides to murder him with a frozen leg of lamb. However, now Mary must deal with the repercussions and cover up the murder. But, the cops are quickly deceived by Mary’s victim act. When analyzing Mary, we

  • The Shot Analysis

    1387 Words  | 6 Pages

    Justice, vengeance and forgiveness are common issues amongst the characters both in Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” and Pushkin’s short story “The Shot”. Both authors display intense irony and symbolism throughout their stories. Poe use these literary elements to create an interesting plot in which the reader can predict the future of the victim throughout the story. Pushkin uses irony to add a twist in the events that occur in his short story. While the stories are very different in

  • Sylvia Plath Poetry Analysis Essay

    1351 Words  | 6 Pages

    Chanel Courant Poetry Analysis As two 20th century female poets who served as feminist figureheads for the literary genre, Sylvia Plath and Adrienne Rich's works experience some expected crossover in thematic content and overarching ideas about the stifling entrapments of womanhood, abuse of power, and pain as means of freedom. Plath's "Lady Lazarus" focuses on the control that comes with the vulnerability and entertainment tied to public displays of mental illness, while Rich's "Valediction Forbidding

  • Examples Of Situational Irony In The Ransom Of Red Chief

    431 Words  | 2 Pages

    Does surprise kindle to emotion, or is surprise simply an emotion itself? In reality, there are many events where humans may experience surprise. However, people may experience surprise through an action, or through speech perhaps. Authors tend to use a device termed situational irony. When situational irony is applied to a story, there often is an unexpected twist in the plot, typically leaving a reader surprised. For instance, O. Henry of “The Ransom of Red Chief” uses situational irony in a comedic

  • Symbolism In The Red Badge Of Courage

    913 Words  | 4 Pages

    Red Badge of Courage Before the war Henry has romanticized ideas of glory and courage but when he nears war his courage falters and he tries to validation of his fear in his peers. When confronted with violence Henry is like a machine fighting off the enemy. This courage Henry had to stand his ground and fight disappeared at the second battle and Henry fled during the battle. The Red Badge of Courage follows Henry’s changing ideas of courage until he finds a lasting form of it. Henry search for courage

  • Character Analysis: The Rez Sisters

    1407 Words  | 6 Pages

    The Rez Sisters by Tomson Highway tells a story of a group of seven Native women that live on Wasaychigan Reserve. The play highlights the struggles and hardships faced by those who live in these settlements. The sisters also further shed light on the internal conflict and individual struggles that each of the characters face. THE WORLD’S BIGGEST BINGO seems to hold the solution to all The Rez Sisters problems and seems to be an escape from their personal demons. Each individual regards the winning

  • Edgar Allan Poe Gothic Analysis

    979 Words  | 4 Pages

    In Edgar Allan Poe’s works, such as Raven, The Tell-Tale Heart, Annabel Lee, and The Fall of the House of Usher, Poe attracts his readers with his one-of-a-kind genre of gothic. Much of his gothic genre in his writings have been influenced by past event in his life. First of all, Poe had never really known his parents because his father had left the house and his mother had died of tuberculosis when he was only three years old. For these reasons, he went to live with Frances and John Valentine Allan

  • Compare And Contrast The Lottery And A Secret For Two Short Story

    1006 Words  | 5 Pages

    One can be blind in the eye or by the heart… “A Secret For Two” by Quentin Reynolds is about a secret shared between a blind man and his only true friend, Joseph. On the other hand, “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson is a warning to humans that violence can happen very often and can be committed by the most ordinary people. A Secret for two and the lottery both uses foreshadowing and suspense to keep the reader on the edge, and share a similarity in language. However, these two stories have a significant