An Analysis Of Ellie Wiesel's Night

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Ellie Wiesel was a Jew who was captured by the German Nazi’s during the Holocaust in 1944. He was only 15 years old when he was sent to the Concentration Camp. Ellie, his mom, his sister, and his dad was sent to the Concentration Camp in Auschwitz. In January 1945 Ellie was transported from Auschwitz to the camp in Buchenwald. He talked about how he remembered walking by the Crematorium and watching them throw babies into the ovens. He also remembered how his mom and his sister was sent straight to the gas chambers to die as soon as they stepped off the cattle car. He remembered waking up one morning and his dad wasn’t there anymore. He knew when he didn’t return that his dad was dead. Ellie however was lucky enough to survive the Holocaust. “Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim, silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.” In this quote, Ellie is talking about how we shouldn’t be neutral toward other people. Being neutral can hurt the victim more than you think.…show more content…
And that is why I swore never to be silent whenever and wherever human beings endure suffering and humiliation.” In this quote Ellie is talking about silence can get you in more trouble than you think. We shouldn’t be silent in bad times like the Holocaust. We should speak up when words need to be spoken. Bad times aren’t the right times to be silent. Ellie Wiesel said during his Nobel Prize speech that silence is nothing but trouble. There is a lot of things in this speech relevant to today. The German Nazi’s were after the Jewish and today terrorists (Isis) after Christians. We need to speak up and not be silent. If people would speak up more often we’d find a way to stop terrorists. Just like Ellie Wiesel said, silence can cause you way more trouble than you actually think. There’s also racism in this world today, Shootings, and killings. Terrorists today are trying to turn people from their religion to get people to be like

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