Analysis Of Ursula Le Guin's 'Sur'

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Storytelling can be described as a powerful tool, with the ability to reach many different individuals and affect their perspectives through the messages they are conveying. Narratives in a similar sense can have perverse effects on human consciousness, leaving impacts of how we think, feel, imagine, remember and relate. Mitchell states that popular fiction is important to society as it contains many important messages that can be disguised as social transformation or ideological revisioning due to the large and diverse audience that it is able to reach (Mitchell, 2012). The focus will be to examine four different popular fiction narratives from this term and the important messages within them that aid or encourage some aspect of social transformation. …show more content…

The main message that I was able to take away from this narrative and the reason that it is so important to society, is that the narrative addresses and confronts gender norms. Gender norms, as described by Monda, is the pattern of what individuals of a particular group or representing a particular social pattern should do and of which is required of them under specified circumstances (“Gender Roles, Norms and Stereotypes”, 1996). Mitchell mentions how narratives can function as a vessel of confidence for female readers, encouraging them to take action towards what is not socially acceptance by ideological standards. “Sur” challenges this notion as an unnamed woman and nine other females embark on an all female expedition to the Antarctic, leaving behind their domestic obligations in order to chase after their dreams and to alter the value of achievement. “Sur” challenges gender norms and societal expectations by the real accounts of a woman who took a risk, proving that females should not be limited to child bearing, cooking and cleaning. “Sur” motivates women like myself, that there is far more to be achieved beyond the domestic realm of the household, although it may not be socially acceptable initially. Mitchell notes that women have been perceived, historically to be more in tune with their emotions, which in this case leads to textual influence, permitting women to gain a sense of passion, drive or …show more content…

Multiple narratives we have examined throughout the term have utilized the zombie metaphor for increased production, technological risks and alienating political institutions to name a few. The popularity of zombies among popular fiction and its symbolism has been reflected to address problems in contemporary society. Similar to the utopian and dystopian element towards the end of “Last Call”, which shows a society or culture that has undergone radical alteration (Mitchell, 2012), “Pride, Prejudice and Zombies”, provides a re-examination of a society under pressure from zombie hordes. The content is a pandemic, which could all be very real given rapid technological changes and uncertainty of the future. “Pride, Prejudice and Zombies is a commentary on that, and encourages different demographics of readers as a remake of Jane Austen’s classic novel. As Jane Austen is considered high-brow, “Pride, Prejudice and Zombies”, although not her work may register a new demographic of readers with new perspectives towards technology and rapid development. The combination of the two genres allows for a greater readership, and although simulated, forces the reader to consider the perverse effects on society and rapid technological growth on the

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