Colonial Unity Dbq

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Upon arriving at Jamestown in 1607, English colonists began their experience towards achieving colonial unity. As much of the old world established dominion over the new colonies, they encountered more competition and continued the struggle to reach colonial unity. Legislation, such as The Mayflower Compact and the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut enabled the colonies to expand upon themselves in such a way that enabled a sense of national identity, and eventually, colonial unity. The start to colonial unity at the colonies began in 1620, when forty-one men signed the Mayflower Compact. This governing document was set to “...enact, constitute, and frame such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions...” (Doc 1). These Protestants …show more content…

As Benign Neglect and Salutary Neglect, came along, so did the unrest and disapproval from the colonists. The colonies were fed up and wanted a, “...virtue of which one general government may be formed in America, including all the said colonies, within and under which government each colony may retain its present constitution...” (Doc 5). The Albany Plan of Union of 1754, was an attempt by the colonists to demonstrate their need for a more stable and personable government. It however was not applied to the colonies. An entry in the Pennsylvania Gazette in 1754 showed the feelings of some colonists. The picture is a cut up snake, with each section representing different colonies, along with “Join, or Die” (Doc 6). This was a way for colonists to be influenced into possibly joining together, and eventually forming colonial unity. “The Problem of Colonial Union” by Ben Franklin in 1754 discussed the animosity towards colonies and that they wish they could get by their own government, “On the subject of uniting the colonies more intimately with great Britain by allowing them representatives in Parliament...all the old acts Parliament restraining the trade or cramping the manufacturers of the colonies be at the same time repealed...” (Doc 7). This eager desire for their ability to be represented in Parliament was noticed by some, but in order …show more content…

With the aid of Benign Neglect, colonists became fed up with Britain's involvement in the colonies, and ultimately was the major turning point for many colonists to desire Colonial unity. With all of this colonial unity and growing national identity, eventually came to a breaking point, in which the colonists clashed with the British. Through growing tensions and legislation such as the Townsend Acts and Sugar Acts, as well as an influx of British troops in the colonies, British colonists became agitated and fed up with the British. This tension will build up until Lexington and Concord, which will bring the colonies into a war for their colonial

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