Columbus Exchange Disease

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The major consequence of Columbus’ voyages was the Columbus Exchange. The Columbus Exchange changed the course of history between the two practically separate worlds. The Old World and the Americas were very different from other. Each one of them had vastly disparate foods, diseases, and animals. Once Columbus “discovered” the Americas an exchange between the New World and Old World began. This exchange of diseases, animals, food crops, ideas, and populations between Afro-Eurasia and the Americas created an inerasable change in history that shaped the world into what it is today. A major exchange that mostly came to the Americas were diseases. These diseases caused major problems for the Natives Americans. There were many infectious diseases …show more content…

Syphilis is the major disease that came to Europe. Its symptoms included genital ulcers, rashes, severe pain, large tumor, and eventually death. Although people cannot be meticulously sure of where this deadly diseases came from, there are two theories. The first is that Syphilis originated from the New World and began spreading by Columbus and his. Christopher Columbus and his crew would have acquired the disease from the inhabitants of Hispaniola through sexual contact. Once the sailors returned home, they spread it throughout Europe. Not only did the disease reach Europe but also Russia, Hungary, Africa, the Middle East, among other places throughout the Old World. The second theory is that the disease had always existed in the Old World but that there had been records before the 1490s because the difference between other diseases had not been noticed. Recent discoveries of the bacterium that caused syphilis was found in a region of Guyana, South America. After much research it was proven that this deadly disease was truly from the New World which disproves the second …show more content…

Before this famous exchange old World crops such as rice, wheat, and barley had never traveled to the New World; crops of the New World including maize, sweet potatoes, and manioc had never been to Afro-Eurasia. The exchange of crops had major consequences for the history of the world. Historian Alfred Crosby said, “The coming together of the continents was a prerequisite for the population explosion of the past two centuries, and certainly played an important role in the Industrial Revolution. The transfer across the ocean of the staple food crops of the Old and New Worlds made possible the former.” Plants that were formerly unknown in the Old World like potatoes, sweet potatoes, and maize expanded supply of agriculture and ensued in more nutritional foods. Other good increased in vitamin intake and had better

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