Comparing Wordsworth And Muir's The Calypso Borealis Adventure

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The Calypso Borealis adventure was a difficult challenge to overcome but in the end, it was worth it for Muir. Wordsworth has strong feelings for the daffodils and nature. "We must accept finite disappointment, but never lose infinite hope."-MLK. Wordsworth and Muir express their strong connection and passion they have for nature using similes and personification to describe the way they feel about Nature to the readers.
Wordsworth has a multitude of personification and similes in the poem, which he uses to express his strong connection to nature. Wordsworth uses simile by relating the daffodils to the stars that “continuously shine”. He uses this simile to show his strong connection with nature by explaining and showing how the daffodils are just like the stars they shine bright and sparkle. Wordsworth enjoys watching the daffodils, he views them like they are stars in the sky. Wordsworth finds himself in awe of nature's beauty as he gazes at a field of daffodils by the sea: "the waves beside them danced; but they outdid the sparkling waves of glee.” A cloud cannot wander or feel lonely so that is giving human characteristics to a cloud. …show more content…

Muir uses the simile to compare the flower to a snow-flower, “the flower was white and made the impression of the utmost purity like a snow-flower.” Muir is using the simile to give you a vision of how white the Calypso really was. He is explaining its beauty by saying that it is like snow because snow is bright, white, and sparkling. Muir uses personification when he says that sitting with the calypso was "more memorable and impressive than any of my meetings with human beings" to convey the profound impact that nature has had on him. Wordsworth finds himself in awe of nature's beauty as he gazes at a field of daffodils by the sea: "the waves beside them danced; but they outdid the sparkling waves of

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