Death In Mexican Culture

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Death is an aspect of life that all cultures must reconcile with, but how cultures reconcile with it varies. American culture tends to sterilize death and remove it from general conversation. The topic of death and the physical remnants of death are usually enclosed and kept as far out of sight as possible. In Mexico, on the other hand, death is both displayed and celebrated. Mexicans embrace death in both their spiritual and cultural lives. Although these two cultures differ on their approach to death, both celebrate October 31 annually. Americans view death as final and permanent. It is common for loved ones to seek time to say goodbye to their deceased family member or friend (Kaleem, 2013, para. 5), and to mourn the fact that they will …show more content…

However, there is a distinct difference between the two holidays. In America, Halloween has shifted from focusing on death to focusing on trick-or-treating. The Day of the Dead celebrates the fact that death does not destroy the unity between those alive and those dead. While both celebrate with dressing up, eating with loved ones, and spending time with family, they gather for vey different reasons. In keeping with their culture, Americans celebrate being with those still alive, while Mexicans include deceased individuals in their …show more content…

In America, death is seen as the final experience on earth, and a grave experience for all individuals involved. In Mexico, death is considered a natural rite of passage and a new aspect of reality. October 31, Halloween in America and The Day of the Dead in Mexico, is celebrated in both cultures. The difference is in the fact that Americans still refuse to recognize the reality of death during the celebration while Mexicans embrace dead loved ones while they celebrate. Although these differences are profound, both are rooted in history, tradition, and

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