Development Of Ethnology

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The term ethnography listed among the categories of qualitative study is a compound word derived from the word ethnos (nation), and grapho (I write), and hence is the study peculiar to the science of ethnology. This discipline of ethnology is a subfield of anthropology, and has its history embedded in the latter. Ethnology compares and analyses the characteristics of different peoples and the relationship between people cultures and social structures (Kollár, 1783). Following Brewer (2000), he describes ethnography as a qualitative study that employs more than one approach for the theoretical framework that fit procedures: questionnaires, interviews, personal documents, experiments, surveys, statistical inference, sampling and new forms of…show more content…
The Smithsonian Institution was a big supporter of anthropological research stated in 1846. Later the Bureau of Ethnology in 1879 began to gather information on Indians. Frank Boas, a German researcher did much to further ethnography in the late 1800'.s He and his students dominated the field in the early 1900's in America. The development of ethnography as a qualitative field derived through the four-field academic concern with Boas’ biological, social, and anthropological work. As a professor at Columbia University in New York City from 1899 until his retirement in 1937, he helped define the discipline and trained many of the most prominent American anthropologists of the 20th century. Many of his students—including Alfred Kroeber, Ruth Benedict, and Margaret Mead—went on to establish anthropology departments at universities throughout the country, (Ellen,…show more content…
Historically research was grounded in the objective, positive paradigm of quantitative analysis. The 1990s impacted ethnography with a paradigm shift from passive observer/researcher, and qualitative research became more participatory and activist-oriented with the process entrenched in the federal branches. The National Institute on Disability Research and Rehabilitation (NIDRR) of the US Department of Education, for example, with Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers for Family and Community Living, 1990, provided leadership. At this time mixed-method approaches impacted the process also, indicating a shift that qualitative and quantitative methods as intrinsically incompatible (Valentine,
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