Egalitarianism In The White Tiger

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Introduction Postcolonial writings have invoked the notion of social Justice, resistance. Freedom and egalitarianism in its attempt to counter dictatorial structures of racial discrimination, prejudice and ill treatment. Subaltern studies ‘occupied a prominent place in post colonial writings. The land owners, the industrialists and the upper classes have always dominated and oppressed the poor, servants and other unprivileged class. Their voices have been silenced and are subjected to exploitation and humiliation. Adiga’s The White tiger records the story of an oppressed, Balaram Halwai and his big fabricated events that structure the novel. The novel throws light on the darkenss of India articulating voice to the voiceless and induces hopes…show more content…
Like all Indians, who are obsessed (A colonial legacy, probably) with the outsider’s gaze he is stimulated to think-about his country and society by the imminent arrival of a foreigner and an important one. So he talks about himself and his country in the solitude of his room. However The White Tiger, Magnus Opus, attempts to highlight the issue of subalterns and their miserable conditions before the world audience. Adiga explains why Balram Halwai writes to the Chinese premier. Balram acknowledges “The future of the world lies with the yellow man and the brown man now that our erstwhile master, the white skinned man has wasted himself through buggery, mobile phone usage and drug abuseand he admires “It said that you Chinese are great lovers of freedom and individual liberty. The British tried to make you their servants, but you never let them do it .The White Tiger comments upon the social disparities in India. The fate of the subalterns is shaped and fashioned by the oppressor.People who live in the darkness of India are destined to serve their masters. People in Laxamangarh worship Hanuman because, “He is shining example of how to serve your master with absolute fidelity, love and devotion.”(19). Balram’s father is hit by poverty and tough manual work. He is always treated as “Donkey and has no respectable place in his life. He is subjected to…show more content…
The land owners, the industrialists and the upper classes have always dominated and oppressed the poor, servants and other unprivileged class. Their voices have been silenced and are subjected to exploitation and humiliation. Adiga’s The White tiger (2008) records the story of an oppressed, Balaram Halwai and his big fabricated events that structure the novel. The novel throws light on the darkenss of India articulating voice to the voiceless and induces hopes in the life of hopeless. Balram Halwai, the protagonist, a strong voice of the underdogs resitas to get a respectable place in life and shakes the very foundation of the system. His struggle for identity and aspiration to be from periphery to centre is warning of underclass to the “Men with big bellies”. His transformation from Munna to Ashok Sharma indicates the rise of subaltern and suggests that the voice of subaltern can not be suppressed for long. Balram reveals the secret of success and awakens hopes and awarenss in the life of half baked that subaltern can illuminate his life. Balram’s protest, resitance ad act of breaking system is a blowng a trumpet for the rise of underdogs and subversion of social structure of India. The White Tiger is one of the Magnus opus literary efforts to bring into notice the issues of subaltern and their miserable condition before the world audience. Adiga’s novel exposes the difficulties that accrue the task of
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