Ex-Confederated Movement: The Lost Cause

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After the Civil War and Reconstruction ceased, the South 's Lost Cause was introduced to the southern United States by ex-confederates. A very politically influenced movement, the Lost Cause, while building a legacy for the controversial Redemption, was subject to backlash for it 's false interpretations of what slavery was like as well as how they interpreted the event of the Civil War. Even with all of its misinterpretations and falsities, however, the Lost Cause influenced the memories of many of the Civil War, Redemption, and slavery for generations to come. The lost cause was spurred by ex Confederates as a way to get back at the union and to prove that the Confederate spirit was not lost, even though the Civil War had ended years ago. As seen from articles from Confederate Veteran Magazine, the Confederate spirit was upheld throughout the years, mostly by women who felt the need to avenge husbands, brothers, and fathers ' deaths . They did things like erect monuments and statues in honor of heroic Confederate leaders, and taught their version of Civil War history in their schools. Together, many ex Confederates and their supporters formed the southern democratic political party, that upheld the Confederates beliefs and ways of life. Their opposers, the southern republicans, were mercilessly attacked repeatedly by the democrats, in an attempt the avenge the Confederacy. The lost cause split the south…show more content…
The Lost Cause was an outlet for many southerners to show their unshakable Confederate pride and in the process of the movement, political complications arose. The Lost Cause also spread hypocritical deceptions about the Civil War, slavery, and redemption, because the information and recollections were given by ex confederates who were very biased. However, it managed to influence many people on the workings of society during the years prior, during, and following the Civil War, making the Lost Cause a very powerful, if not important movement in the United
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