Jane Austen's Use Of Irony In Pride And Prejudice

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Irony in Pride and Prejudice
• Novels in Austen’s time included an educational notion in order to address society’s expectations, yet as Andrew H. Wright very aptly remaks,irony, at the hands of Jane Austen, is the “instrument of a moral vision’’ and this is what makes Austen’s novels so interesting, as even in modern times, one cannot simply categorise her novels as being conservative, modern, or feministic literary works. Although various meanings of the word irony may be sought, one must keep Austen’s use of the word irony in mind to understand the novel the way she wanted to illustrate it; uses a tool for unveiling and describing.
• Austen makes use of irony throughout her literary career yet in this particular novel, there is a great deal of reference to verbal, thematic, situational, and dramatic irony. This idea is seen from the very beginning, within the title: the reader might get a
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Collins that she is not the type to reject the first proposal and accept the second but does exactly this when Darcy proposes a second time, convincing herself that Darcy has ‘’no improper pride. He is perfectly amiable.’’ The departure of the militia from Meryton which was expected to put an end to Lydia's flirtations, brings about her elopement and ironically, this is what brings Elizabeth and Darcy together. Lady Catherine, attempting to prevent their marriage only succeeds in hastening it as Elizabeth states; ‘’he is a gentleman, I am a gentleman’s daughter, so far we are equal’’.
• The use of irony in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice; Theresa Weisensee-
• To conclude, the irony of Jane Austin is not grounded in bitterness but it is rather directed towards enriching comedy. She manages to bring adult perceptions while at the same time, she is capable of exposing the hypocrisy and pretentiousness of contemporary English society. As Klingel Ray states Austen is ‘’first and foremost a satirist, and for a satirist, irony is the major tool of
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