Latin American Boom Analysis

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The 1960s and 1970s were decades of political turmoil in Latin American countries , in a political and diplomatic climate strongly influenced by the dynamics of the Cold War. This formed the background for the work of the writers of the Latin American Boom, and defined the context in which their sometimes radical ideas had to operate The Latin American Boom was a literary movement that not only impacted literature but impacted politics throughout Latin America gateway to modern Latin American Literature that created an international profile and left be-hind a worldwide reputation with these talented and rebellious novelists freely expressing their political views within their writings it was only a matter of time before change began. Although…show more content…
He was considered the starter of the Boom. His novel from 1958 called La Region Mas Transparente (where the air is clear) is said to be the first of the Boom novels. Fuentes witnessed racial injustices in America he stated that “There were signs in Texas restaurants saying, 'No Mex-icans or dogs allowed.' Waitresses would say, 'Stop talking that dirty lingo.' There was tremen-dous racism and prejudice against Mexicans, which there still is”. Fuentes stated that this shaded my childhood and shaped my sense of Mexicanness” (theguardian.com). Along with being a tal-ented novelist Fuentes was a powerful political voice for Latin America. He made it clear that they intended to demonstrate commonalties shared within the nations, instead of showcasing the differences. As the leader of the group Fuentes was really pushing the writers’ publications be-tween the US and Europe, he also brought the writers…show more content…
This literary movement did not only open doors for future literary geniuses but it subtly brought attention to political issues within Latin America. If it weren't for the big four, which are Cortazar, Garcia Marquez, Vargas Llosa and Fuentes there wouldn't be a historical moment in Latin American literature to look back too; let alone to put Latin American literature on the map internationally. These four writers made what may have seem impossible happen; with great work and dedication. They put themselves out there for criticism and run ins with not only their gov-ernment but other countries government. All to be able to achieve change within the government but also to change the way Latin American literature was created. Susmitha wrote: Apart from Brazilian literature, which is written primarily in Portuguese, nearly all Latin American literature is in Spain, and is often designated by critics as Spanish American or Hispanic-American literature. Magical realism, or the introduction of supernatural or uncanny el-ements into the otherwise realistic narrative, also became a common feature in the works of many Latin American writers during the second half of the twentieth century. Since the 1940s and the Boom period of the 1960s, Latin American literature has become increasingly available to a worldwide
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