Mildred In Fahrenheit 451

493 Words2 Pages

In the book Fahrenheit 451, we are introduced to two characters with two very different, but also very important, characteristics. Mildred, Guy Montag’s wife, is a shining example of how a member of this society should think and act. Clarisse, however, is the polar opposite of
Mildred.
The society of 451 is that of one without thought, creativity, and books. Mildred lives life content with these rules and regulations. She functions as many others do in this society. It was through the other members of society and her will to be popular among others where she was influenced to act as she does. She is afraid of the government, and often acts to save herself in risky situations, such as when she tipped of Captain Beatty of Guy’s collection of …show more content…

You read and I look around, but there isn’t anybody!” (Bradbury 73).
This quote from Mildred is so painfully ironic, considering she, as stated before, spends most of her time watching T.V., which is nothing but fake people in fake situations. This quote also defines Mildred’s close-mindedness and how content she is without change or really any ‘life’ in her life.

There are few in 451’s society that does not act as all others do. Clarisse is a prime example of one. She likes to be different and ask questions while other live life without truly living. Clarisse constantly talked of her family who liked to walk places and ask questions, just as she does. It was through her family where she had gotten her influence to how she acts and talks. Another thing about Clarisse is she liked to talk. In fact, she talked so much about everything and anything that, due to how this society functioned, she was marked ‘antisocial’. “I’m antisocial, they say. I don’t mix. It’s so strange. I’m very social indeed.” (Bradbury 29). Clarisse also goes on to explain how the society’s view of social is completely different to hers. “You’re not like the others. I’ve seen a few; I know. When I talk, you look at me. When I said something

Open Document