Patrick Henry's Rhetorical Summary: After The Revolutionary War

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After seven years of the fighting the French and Indian War, tensions had grown between Britain and its American colonies. In response to the substantial debt Britain was burdened with after the war, they began taxing the colonist with the intent of recuperating their losses. The colonist, who had not been given representation in the British parliament, felt the taxes were unfair. After more than a decade of increased restrictions and taxes, the prominent members of the colonial society were left with a decision to make: pay the taxes willingly or prepare for war ("Patrick Henry’s Speeches"). Although many colonists believed action against the British was necessary, only a few were willing to voice their opinions. On March 23, 1775, Patrick Henry decided it was time that his voice was heard (Kindig). His statements on that day later became known as “Liberty or Death” (Kindig).…show more content…
When he asked, “And what have we to oppose to them? Shall we try argument?” and responded with, “Sir, we have been trying that for the past ten years,” he intended to show that war against Britain was the next logical step for the colonist. This use of rhetorical questioning was meant to appeal to the logical side of the members of the Virginia Convention (Kindig). He asked the convention to look at the past actions of the British and realize that the king’s intent was to benefit himself without regard for the wishes of the
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