British Empire Essays

Sort By:
  • Good Essays

    The British Empire “The sun never sets on the British Empire”, is a well-used phrase about the old British Empire, where Britain ruled almost one-quarter of the world’s population. They had colonies in all the continents in the world. How did Britain manage to get all these colonies? And why did they suddenly lose the whole Empire? What have the coloni zation had to say for the countries involved? And does the old British Empire still have any effect on Britain and the world today? Well hold your

    • 1139 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Was the British Empire a force for good? The British Empire brought many changes to the world, good and bad, to many people in different countries e.g. Africa and India. Some of these changes involved innovations in medical care, education and railways. The British Empire profited from slavery in the eighteenth century, but fought to abolish slavery in the nineteenth century. For many people, the British Empire meant loss of lands, discrimination and prejudice. Such a big empire had lots of everlasting

    • 961 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The British empire, widely labelled the most expansive of its kind throughout recorded history by various historians and for good reason, owes its success to a multitude of factors. From colonisation and religious conversion to new trade routes and a constant demand for new resources. Arguably, however, the foundation for the empire’s achievements can be attributed to Britain’s extensive exploration/discovery exploits. Continuously watching from the sidelines with countries such as Spain, Portugal

    • 1797 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Was the British Empire a force for good? The British Empire had a huge impact globally. It can be argued that it was a “force for good” because British brought some positive changes such as roads, hospitals. They needed roads and hospital so they could have more workers and their kids were provided with health care. However it could be argued that the British rule had negative consequences. For example people were forced to learn British because the British Empire refuse to do business in other

    • 863 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Who Would Be King, this is exactly what he was doing. The novella is a story about imperialism in the British Empire and how it impacted its citizens and countries they conquered. Kipling portrayed his negative attitude toward the British Empire through the use of figurative language and diction. The Man Who Would Be King is a depiction of Kipling’s experience with the British Empire when he was growing up in India. Throughout the story, Kipling utilizes figurative language to portray

    • 760 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    7 Years War Dbq Analysis

    • 795 Words
    • 4 Pages

    conflicts eventually reached the British American colonies and the war lasted in the colonies from 1754-1763. When the war came to a close, the British Empire began to increase their presence in the American colonies. Also, as a result of the war with France, the British was crippled with war debt. To help pay for the cost of the Seven Years’ War, taxes was increased in the American colonies. The rapid deviations in the colonists’ lives began to create tension between the Empire and colonies. These unforeseen

    • 795 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    An empire may be defined as the ruling of a defeated nation, by a conquering power , who exploits the population for the advancement of the empires mother land . This defeated population then becomes known as imperial subjects, who are depicted as distinctly different and exploitable. It may be said that empires, enrich themselves at the expense of others and are therefore driven by a system of mercantilism. Furthermore, it may be said that an empire, is a political order that rules over a significant

    • 1964 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    observes that “the friction of the great beast’s foot had stripped the skin from [the Dravidian coolie’s] back as neatly as one skins a rabbit.” (para. 4) Instead of boosting the amount of resources the Burmese have, this lucid description describes the empire tearing away the natural resources from the natives.

    • 372 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Although it is inaccurate to limit the governance system of British imperialism throughout the 19th and 20th century as indirect, it is relevant to underline that the British majoritarly pursued indirect colonialism especially in Africa. Indeed, after centuries of settler and direct colonialism, British imperialism soon came to realize the advantage of an indirect type of rule in their newest colonies when considering the economic benefits but also the pre-colonial societies of Africa. Indeed, most

    • 1205 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The three factors that motivated the British to colonise South Africa is to expand land, to colonial competition against other European Empires, and to take over South Africa for routes to India. These three factors motivated the British to colonise South Africa for its power. Firstly, South Africa had a lot of space for the British to grow their economy and expand their empire. By expanding their land to South Africa, they could start mining for rich minerals like diamonds, gold, iron e.t.c and

    • 951 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    similar people. Rhodes supports imperialism due to the way control and power can be spread. Do you think that Rhodes would have viewed indigenous peoples as equals once they had become part of the British Empire? Provide examples of his statements regarding the addition of foreigners into the British Empire and share your own ideas and analysis. Rhodes provides a unique comparison to illustrate his views towards indigenous

    • 767 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Revolution on Great Britain When it comes time for you to write the fall of the British Empire, I will gladly supply you with the great many documents in my possession.- Benjamin Franklin. The impacts of America today are both wide, and numerous, and they have been for as long as the country has existed. The effects of the American Revolution rippled both far and wide, perhaps no more so than in Great Britain. On average, empires only last for 250, so GReat BRitian was approaching its expiration date.

    • 805 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    the British Empire colonized places such as Burma, India. In George Orwell’s essay, “Shooting an Elephant”, he gives a first person account of imperialism. His retrospective story entails a moral dilemma he faced as a British police officer in Burma. Orwell uses the themes of imperial representation resentment to demonstrate the true nature of imperial colonialism and its effects on both the victims and prosecutors. The theme of imperial representation shows how those who follow the British Empire

    • 901 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    many powerful European empires set out to see what the New World had in store for them. Each empire had their own individual agendas and incentives for colonization. This led to the many differences between methods of colonization and exploration in every colony and region. The Atlantic World portrayed these contrasts between the Spanish, French, Dutch and British empires. However, the British settlements along the Eastern seaboard differed the most from those of other empires because there were no

    • 1162 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The first time that the British showed economic interest in India was the 1600s. The British set up trading posts in several places including Bombay, Madras, and also Calcutta. In the beginning the Mughal Empire which is India’s ruling Empire had done a pretty good job of keeping the European traders under control until 1707 when the Empire had started collapsing. In the year of 1757, General Robert Clive had led the troops of the East India Company to a victory over the Indian forces who were allied

    • 673 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    British’s Overseas Colonies When thinking about the history of the 13 colonies and the colonization of British here on this side of the Atlantic Ocean, no one seems to know the actual background of the British Empire in regards to their colonial business. After reading The Making and Unmaking of Empire by P.J. Marshall and discussing the same topics in lecture, it is evident that the British Empire had struggles trying to colonize overseas in North America and India. While colonizing overseas, some

    • 583 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Imperialist Empires

    • 1472 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The fifth example is what the imperialist empires, in regards to other races considered below them and inferior to them, believe their purpose in the world to be. For example, the British empire believed that its role was “educating and Christianizing the ideigenous population to the point where they could expect someday, even if that day were long off, to govern themselves. They believed they were bringing progress and improvement to people who had fallen under the sway of ‘oriental despots’

    • 1472 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Therefore, this paper will focus on events and ideas that I considered most important, and which dominated Britain in the late-nineteenth century. After 1815, because the British faced no real competition to their status as the dominant world power, they felt far less pressure to further their empire overseas. Though the empire did continue to expand in the early and mid-nineteenth century, it was done in a sporadic way that was driven more by pressures on colonial frontiers than by policies at home

    • 442 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    to Britain. It can be argued that the key reason for the development of the British economy in the 18th century was its role in the slave trade, although there were many other factors involved such as the industrial revolution and the British Empire. The transatlantic slave trade was extremely important to the development of the British economy in the 18th century. Slave ships needed large crews in

    • 763 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    allowed their nations to explore the world. European nations looked for how to extend its political and military power among the world. However, economic power appears as an important matter for the Empires´ maintenance and hence, trade appeared as a tool to create such Economic control. European Empires found opportunities to develop trade in Asian countries that faced instability. Developing political agreements in order to establish monopolies was the initial stage for future trade companies’ economic

    • 558 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays