Pyramus In A Midsummer Night's Dream

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Throughout the course of A Midsummer Night 's Dream, we continue to see William Shakespeare 's fascination with tragic romance. The romance between Hermia and Lysander, for example, depicts the couple as desperate and willing to do anything in order to be together, even in death. This, of course, is a reflection of Shakespeare 's most famous play, Romeo and Juliet. In fact, the dialogue between Hermia and Lysander at the end of Act I Scene I, If then true lovers have been ever crossed It stands as an edict of destiny Russ Mcdonald and Lena Cowen Orlin, eds., The Bedford Shakespeare: Based on the New Cambridge Shakespeare Edition (Boston and New York: Bedford/St. Martin 's, 2015),1.1, pp.352 , is a subtle reminder of the events in Romeo and …show more content…

Pyramus and Thisbe, however, is a lot more similar to Romeo and Juliet than Hermia and Lysander because Pyramus stabs himself after incorrectly thinking Thisbe is dead. The difference comes in the delivery of the plays, while Romeo and Juliet is dark and maudlin, Pyramus and Thisbe is not. Bottom 's portrayal of Pyramus is quite comedic as it shows the actors struggle to say their lines, use props, how to use prologues, and acting itself. It seems that Shakespeare was making a point in this play to tell the audience that not everyone can be an actor. As an educated playwright, it is most likely that Shakespeare believed common folk could not appreciate the arts. Although this is not necessarily true, it emphasizes the division between the high and low class. Still, instead of berating the workers for attempting to put on a play, Shakespeare shows the nobility feeling pity towards Bottom. Equally as important, is the constant mention of the moon because it seems that the moon is largely responsible for the troubles all the couples are having. At the beginning of the play Theseus is eager to bed Hippolyta and blames the moon for making the nights go slow by saying This old moon wanes! She lingers my desires, Like to a step-dame or dowager Long withering out a young man 's revenue. Russ Mcdonald and Lena Cowen Orlin, eds., The Bedford …show more content…

A character that I enjoyed disliking was Robin Goodfellow or Puck, as he narrated some of the scenes throughout the play. I found it adequate that he would narrate some scenes because his playful character adds a lightheartedness to the play. The most surprising thing I found were the ending lines when Puck says, While these visions did appear, And this weak and idle theme, No more yielding but a dream. Russ Mcdonald and Lena Cowen Orlin, eds., The Bedford Shakespeare: Based on the New Cambridge Shakespeare Edition (Boston and New York: Bedford/St. Martin 's, 2015),5.1.411-13, pp.392 As I continued to read the play, I thought it was strange that although the conflicts had been resolved long before the play, it had not ended. One reason for this could be the need to portray life as a play. Puck is the only one who knows the play is not real, but life can be like a dream sometimes. Moments come and go as if you are sleeping and before you know it, it ends. Some people argue that the play could be a dream of any one of the characters, I believe it is a real possibility. So far, this has been the most confusing Shakespeare play I have read but also

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