Satire In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

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Best known for their creative and fun storylines, Walt Disney Pictures inspires children and adults alike to think, laugh, and cry, often all in the same movie. Disney’s definition also comes from its impressive morals that go hand in hand with the determination, humor, and love in each movie. The Beauty and the Beast teaches children to love the beauty within; The Little Mermaid teaches viewers to embrace adventure and exploration. Disney movies of all kinds are worthwhile to watch because they teach important life lessons. Like popular Disney movies, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn teaches valuable life lessons that any person should take the time to learn. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a purposeful read because of Mark Twain’s …show more content…

Throughout the novel, Pap abused the beloved Huck, so readers learned to despise him. So, when pap ranted about how he would “never vote again” (36) when he saw an African American man vote, readers are given the choice to be like pap or change their racist views. Twain uses the likeability of Huck and the hatred of Pap to change racist views. Mark Twain also used the king, another dislikeable character, to change racist attitudes. After the scam with the Wilks family money, the king and the duke went to a different town to get money. The duke went directly into town, whereas the king “sold out his chance in [Jim]” for a quick forty dollars. The king treated Jim like garbage: forgetting about everything the poor slave had done for him. The king used Jim as a toy that could be bought or sold. Because of this, readers learned to despise the king and his racist beliefs. Like the king, Tom also treated Jim as an object left to his disposal. Tom’s hunger for adventure only gets stronger as the story develops. In fact, Tom desired adventure so much that he was willing to risk Jim’s life so he could be a renowned adventurer. Huck spoke about rescuing Jim from the Phelps family so he could be free again, and Tom jumped at the idea of having an adventure. Not until the adventure was complete did Tom admit that he only “wanted the adventure of [rescuing …show more content…

Actions in each scene teach good and bad lessons to society. Through Mark Twain’s satirical content, readers become aware of their gullibility, cruel forms of entertainment, and the lack of morals of wealthy citizens. Twain reflects advanced views on slavery through Huck’s treatment of Jim throughout the novel, from happiness in finding a traveling partner, to shame in hurting his only friend, to compassion in doing what is right to help someone in need. Contrary to belief, Huck’s maturity does not deteriorate through submissiveness, yet grows stronger in his wholehearted determination to save Jim. Like popular Disney movies, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is completely purposeful because of each lesson taught to viewers who take the time to

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