Sherlock Holmes Accomplishments

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Arthur Conan Doyle was born into a Catholic family in Scotland on May 22, 1859, This is the day that the world was blessed with the author of the Sherlock Holmes novels. His parents were Mary and Charles Doyle, and they were very creative people. His mother, however, was more successful than his father. At the age of 9, Arthur was sent to a Jesuit school. This is where he discovered his love for writing. In school, Arthur was bullied, which plays into his style of writing later on. In 1876, Arthur started his education in medicine, which came to a shock to his artistic family. Whenever trying to support his family with just being a doctor didn't work out that well, he began to write short stories for extra money. During this time…show more content…
However, it was completely obvious that his true calling was writing stories about mysteries rather than helping sick people. In 1880, Arthur officially began his medical career. Around 1882-1883, Arthur began his own medical practices because he was impatient with partners. However, this was not very successful, and led him to begin writing fictional stories for extra support. He had trouble finding people to publish his works, but he eventually succeeded and had his first work published in a magazine. Some of his most famous works include “A Study in Scarlet,” “Rodney Stone,” “The Sign of Four,” “The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes,” and “The Hound of Bakersvilles.” His all time most famous character is Sherlock Holmes. During his life, Arthur had a lot of influences that helped him in creating the wonderful novels that we know today as Sherlock Holmes. His mother was one of the biggest influence on his writing career because of the magical stories she told him when he was a child. While a child, he read Edgar Allen Poe stories which were a great contributor to his style of writing. Two of the stories that played a role were “The Gold Bug,” and “The Murder in the Rue Morgue.” During his college years, his professor Dr. Joseph Bell was the inspiration for the fantastic mystery solver, Sherlock Holmes. In 1892, in a letter to Bell, Doyle wrote, "It is most certainly to you that I owe Sherlock
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