Greed In Charles Dickens A Tale Of Two Cities

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The desire to be successful exists in everyone but success is often associated with the possession of wealth and material goods. These characteristics in people will lead to unhappiness. One particular sin evident in the world today is greed. Greed is defined as an excessive desire to possess wealth or goods and the greed that exists in the world leads people to unhappy and selfish lives. This is evident in individual people, corporate companies and in the government. When an individual feels that money and good will bring them happiness in their lives, they become more and more determined to obtain it. Over the years, after many studies, psychologists across the country came up with the reason why people have a clear love of money. It is not…show more content…
Self-absorption and greed similarly disfigure the hearts and minds of the people in the story. The Marquis St. Evrémonde, who is attractive changes to look treacherous and cruel. He represents all that is evil in the French aristocracy. If the aristocracy does not care about God or about finding meaning in their lives, then they definitely do not care for the lives of the lower classes. “The leprosy of unreality disfigured every human creature in attendance upon Monseigneur. In the outermost room were half a dozen exceptional people who had had, for a few years, some vague misgiving in them that things in general were going rather wrong. As a promising way of setting them right, half of the half-dozen had become members of a fantastic sect of Convulsionists, and were even then considering within themselves whether they should foam, rage, roar, and turn cataleptic on the spot—thereby setting up a highly intelligible”(Dickens 186) The incident with the Marquis and the child illustrates this disregard for the common people. Marquis reveals himself to be heartless and supremely arrogant by believing that he could pay for a child life as if they were for sale. This illustrates the inhumanity amongst the
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