The Family Systems Theory

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Introduction
A famous film star, Katherine Hepburn once stated, “Death will be a great relief. No more interviews.” Even though Hepburn was probably interviewed too many times and asked many questions, most social workers must utilize the interview process to make assessments of their clients. An accurate assessment is critical and significant first step in the social work process. Information about problems or situation needs to be gathered, analyzed and interpreted (Zastrow & Kirst-Ashman, 2010). BJ is a 69-year-old male, born in Rhode Island. He met his wife at a Jazz Club in Providence, Rhode Island and they have been married for 33 years. BJ still resides in Providence, Rhode Island with his wife, oldest daughter with her three children
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The Differentiation of Self is one of the concepts and it describes how people cope with life demands and pursue their goals on a continuum from most adaptive to least. Variations in the adaptiveness depend on several connected factors, including the amount of solid self, the part of self that is not negotiable in a relationship. Triangles are the basic molecule of human relationship systems. A two-person dyad becomes unstable once anxiety increases. Then, one or both members of the dyad usually pull in a third person to relieve some of the pressure. In a three-person system, anxiety has more places to go, and the relationship where it originated experiences some relief. When the three-person system can no longer contain the anxiety, it involves more people and forms a series of interlocking triangles (Butler et al,…show more content…
The theory looks at many aspects of the family such as atmosphere, constellation, and goals, plus, respect is given to both children and adults. In this system interventions are suggested for children and adults.
The limitations of the Family Systems Theory are, too much is focused on homeostasis at the expense of change and patterns at the expense of unpredictability. Moreover, on the system at the expense of the individuals. A positivistic intellectual tradition that puts the researcher outside the system in search of strengths and limitations of the theory of the family (Turner & West, 1998). Likewise, Family System Theory has not resulted in a body of theoretical assertions or hypothesis which can be tested (Broderick & Smith, 1979; Fitzpatrick & Noller, 1993). The fields of system theory are information theory and cybernetics. Hence, this group of theories can help us understand a wide variety of physical, biological, social, and behavioral processes, including communication (Infante,
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