The Social Class In Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

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Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre provided Victorian England with a new kind of woman who represented a shift in the common view of what Mary Wollstonecraft asserted was a limited education for women. Their education kept them childlike and superficial, with most of their attention going toward appearance and with being satisfied mostly with matters of the home. The social pressures prevented women from becoming more interesting through reason and substance which were confined to the masculine sphere. Jane Eyre and Blanche Ingram, with their distinct backgrounds and because of different events both ladies have gone through, separately, can determine how different these two ladies are. Jane Eyre’s social class throughout her life was very ambiguous, never really fitting into one category, often in between levels of the social spectrum. Blanche Ingram, however, had been brought up in the upper class, through-and-through. In chapter 11, Jane moves on from being a poor teacher at Lowood Orphanage and becomes a governess. Much later on, in chapter 27-28 Jane runs away from Thornfield Hall after she find out about the devil incarnate, Bertha Mason, and is now recognized as a homeless beggar. Soon after, Jane is rescued by three women and a man, who is…show more content…
John, they are all siblings, except for one, she a servant. In the end, after St. John and his sisters are revealed to be Jane Eyre’s cousins, Jane inherits a large sum of money (20k pounds), by her late uncle, John Eyre, in chapter 33. With this money, she then runs off

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