To Kill A Mockingbird Equality Analysis

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Not all the Same Equality is a term that is defined as “the state of being equal; correspondence in quantity, degree, value, rank, or ability” (Dictionary.com). In Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, equality dictates how several characters are portrayed in the town of Maycomb, Alabama, at a time of racism, hate, and prejudice. Because of these topics being such an everyday obstacle for characters like Walter Cunningham Jr. and Burris Ewell, two students at the school, Boo Radley, a scared neighbor that saves a life, and Tom Robinson, a black man wrongly convicted of a crime, the idea of equality has a different effect on each character’s life. For instance, there are numerous times that equality plays a big role throughout this novel. The first time that equality plays a big part in this novel is right off the bat in Chapter 2 involving Walter Cunningham Junior. Everybody treats Walter differently right away, knowing that his family does not have as much money as everyone else, with quotes such as, “Walter’s one of the Cunningham’s, Miss Caroline” (Lee 20). This quote helps prove that people treat Walter differently, because Scout is referring to him as a “Cunningham”. She is saying this as if he is the town scum or that he is lower on the social scale. One incident that does occur throughout all of this happening is when Scout and Walter get into a fight in the school yard. The reason this happens is because Scout gets into trouble with Miss Caroline after trying to
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