True Socialism In The Communist Manifesto By Karl Marx

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RUSSIA DID NOTHING WRONG
Karl Marx has been responsible for the creation of numerous countries and ideologies which ostensibly strive to achieve the goals laid out by him in his Communist Manifesto. Of all the sovereign states which have labeled themselves as a socialist one, none have been as ingrained in the American populace such as the USSR. Stalinism, while maintaining many of the necessary rules from the manifesto to perhaps be labeled socialism, would not have been considered by Marx to be true socialism. The methods that Stalin would come to employ would serve to embolden his power, not the state, through means of a personality cult and power increase.
Within the communist manifesto there are volumes of text outlining the path with …show more content…

Until the late 1930’s and Stalin’s ruthless policies, it was not a developed industrial state. With the USSR having been born from the backwards monarchy in place before, it would take a strong central leader to lead the country to progress (SOURCE). This line of thinking is a large part of Stalin’s reasoning to continue his amount of power within the state from the moment he was instilled. His reasoning also followed that in order to fulfill Marx’s underlying theme of the eventual states communist society, a state must be centrally strong in order to defend against enemies before the state is safe to relinquish its power over time and eventually “wither …show more content…

Karl Marx was a contender of this act in already industrially developed countries. The entire validity of the Communist Manifesto is thwarted when you apply this books policies to lesser and undeveloped nations. When these land reforms were initiated by Stalin, Russia had not yet grown into the industrial powerhouse it would one day become. It was a complete failure in the Ukraine, caucuses, and Kazakhstan with millions going hungry. Ukraine was especially hard-hit by this decision, so much so that it has been given the famine the name “Holodomor”. Now, this is a Ukrainian word meaning “To kill by starvation” which was termed by local Ukrainians who lived through this time period. Numbers vary, although the deaths range from 2.4 million to as high as 12

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