English poets Essays

Sort By:
  • Good Essays

    up in a highly religious home and showed poetic talent as a young girl. “Although her religious temperament was closer to her mother, the youngest member of the remarkable family poets, artists, and critics, inherited many artistics tendencies from her father.” (Everett) “One of the most important of English women poets both in range and quality. She excelled in the works of fantasy, in poems for children and in religious poetry.” (Bryson) Christina’s famous works included “Goblin Market and Other

    • 804 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In an excerpt from her novel We Were the Mulvaneys, Joyce Carol Oates uses disorganized syntax, detailed imagery, and repetition to characterize the speaker, Judd Mulvaney, as a young, curious boy, coming-of-age and suddenly aware of his maturity and of the realities of life. In the excerpt, Oates uses disorganized and unusual syntax to display the enormity of Judd’s revelation, thus alluding to his sudden awareness and depicting him as a young boy shocked by the brevity of life. As Judd comes to

    • 774 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Soldier Poem Analysis

    • 1195 Words
    • 5 Pages

    When war was announced to the public, in 1914, young men across the country of England were eager to experience the exaltation associated with fighting for their beloved country. This devotion for their country is passionately echoed in the poem “The Soldier”, written by Rupert Brooke. As the battles continued, the true-colours of war unravelled for the soldiers, and the atmosphere portrayed in the war poetry changed drastically. This heinous exposure brought upon the soldiers was conveyed in the

    • 1195 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Refugee Blues Essay

    • 978 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Compare and contrast the ways that Owen and Auden present the effects of war in ‘Disabled’ and ‘Refugee Blues’. Both ‘Disabled’ and ‘Refugee Blues’ intensely explore the horrors and misconceptions of war using similar and distinct tones and structures. Owen chose to present the effects of war in ‘Disabled’ by using more emotive language than Auden had used in ‘Refugee Blues’: this is evident in Owens constant reference to the ‘warrior’, whom is the voice of the poem, throughout each stanza. However

    • 978 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Make it Stop Hosseini’s novel, The Kite Runner, explores deeply the topics of pain and punishment. He shows how the the pain characters receive affect their lives. Most characters suffer from physical pain, but what really haunts them is their emotional pain. Through his novel, Hosseini demonstrates how people often seek physical punishment in order to escape their emotional pain, but are not able to. Physical punishment is preferable due to the fact that emotional pain is much stronger than physical

    • 1078 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In both poems Ode on a Grecian Urn and Ode to a Nightingale, Romantic poet John Keats narrates a state of envious longing for the immortal nature of his subjects, visualizing the idyllic, beautiful world that each encapsulates, thus offering him a form of escapism. This fancying forms a connection that immortality is beautiful compared to human mortality, with both poems realizing that this ideal world is unrealistic to be apart of. But, these poems differ in how the narrator views this immortal

    • 800 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    If your only goal is to become rich, you will never achieve it,” the prominent businessman of his time, John D. Rockefeller once said. This is a truth that readers learn from reading Guy de Maupassant’s short story, “The Necklace.” In this short story, a woman named Mathilde Loisel’s humility is abused by pride and greed but changed and improved as the story went along. Mathilde’s nature towards her husband and others was ungrateful and unappreciative. To begin with, Mathilde was a “pretty and charming”

    • 732 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    “The Natural Talent” Talent as defines by many critics, is a gift and innate ability that enables someone to be special than others in a particular field, no matter who they are or in which field they superior. However, these critics agree with the definition of this innate talent but differ in the way of elaborate. Some of them believe in this special ability could be achieves or could be obtain with practice, while others focus on one side and neglect the other. To Aristotle, the

    • 964 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    And the Afterlife Goes On: Examining Tension in Robert Browning’s “The Bishop Orders His Tomb at Saint Praxed’s Church” This paper attempts a critical study of Robert Browning’s “The Bishop Orders His Tomb at Saint Praxed’s Church” focusing on the tension in the poem and on the Bishop’s notion of the afterlife. This poem was first published in Hood’s Magazine as “The Tomb at St Praxed’s (Rome, 15—)” and later in Dramatic Romances and Lyrics in 1845. The poem, a dramatic monologue, is written in

    • 1530 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    True Love Analysis

    • 1521 Words
    • 7 Pages

    True love is possibly the most fulfilling of life's secret treasures. but love by a lesser standard is still extremely important for the human experience. In the poem True Love by Wislawa Szymborska Wislawa talks of how true love is overrated and unnecessary. But in truth the argument against true love is created to comfort those who lack it. Love, if not true love is an crucial emotion for the human race; it is important for psychological development, social development, and in the end happiness

    • 1521 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    One of the central plots in Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness is Marlow’s attachment to Mr. Kurtz. There are several suggestions in Marlow’s character and narrative that give us insight to the possible reasons that may have resulted in his strange and ironic attachment to Kurtz. The focus of this essay will be on Marlow’s style of narration and his representation of Kurtz. These central issues will be dealt with through the lenses of three core traits that Marlow exhibits which are curiosity, perceptiveness

    • 2318 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    resistance to any excess of emotion. The words are allowed to determine their own intense and tightly bound system of relationships: the intellect takes control of situation. It is this lack of thought in poetry for which Enright and the other Movement poets criticize Dylan Thomas. Enright explains that Thomas’s poetry is obscure and deficient in intellectual conviction. Similar view is adapted by Conquest in his Introduction to the Newlines. Conquest calls for a renewed attention to the ‘necessary intellectual

    • 996 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Todd Boss Poem

    • 1004 Words
    • 5 Pages

    control and how devoted he is to the auditor. the alliteration of wrings whimpers emphasizes not only how strong the love is but his own expression of discontent. The free verse format suggests a certain type of speaking from the heart because the poet is not restricted by meter or rhyming. The diction creates the shifting

    • 1004 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    passionate expression of Milton’s religious and political vision, the culmination of his young literary ambition as a 17th century English poet. Milton inherited from his English predecessors a sense of moral function of poetry and an obligation to move human beings to virtue and reason. Values expressed by Sir Philip Sidney, Spencer and Jonson. Milton believes that a true poet ought to produce a best and powerful poem in order to convince his readers to adopt a scheme of life and to instruct them in a

    • 1305 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    “I have a rendezvous with Death”. This poem is written by Alan Seeger. It talks about situation of speaker in war on theme of death. He starts his title “I have a rendezvous with Death” with paradoxical words. The word "rendezvous" is a positive term where people arrange to meet each other with willing. For the word "Death" also known as in negative term means losses that no one wants to meet with him. He also uses ironic diction. There are three stanzas; six, eight, and ten lines. Including to rhyme

    • 1000 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    John Donne was an English poet, cleric in the Church of England and a lawyer, who was known as the representative of metaphysical poets. He has a great range of literary works that he wrote but his most recognized are sonnets. One of the most important themes in his poems is the concept of the true religion about which he wrote many worldly poems in which he showed his substantial attention in religious beliefs. The best example for this are his 19 Holy Sonnets, which were published 2 years after

    • 760 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Abstract This paper describes the poetry of a well-known poet JOHN DONNE, in respect to his combination of love and religious poetry in the context of his metaphysical poems. The main themes of his poetry always aroused from the thought of ecstasy. In his poetry we can find a definite link between human love and divine love. He truly describes how the two souls in love depart from their bodies during their physical union and spiritually join together before returning to their actual bodies. This

    • 1907 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Minstrel Boy Analysis

    • 1054 Words
    • 5 Pages

    On May 28, 1779 the history of Irish music would change forever. On this time in history, Thomas Moore was born into a Roman Catholic family. At this time in history in Ireland, Roman Catholics could not own land, be educated, or vote. Even though Thomas Moore was born into a Roman Catholic family, he still achieved greatness through his music. Thomas Moore was one of the first Catholics to go to Trinity College. He went to Trinity College to become a lawyer, which is what his mother wanted and

    • 1054 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    compare and contrast; the poetic techniques, the shape of the poems and the use of meter. This essay will also highlight how these features link in with the main themes of sexual desires, religion and repetition to evoke the meaning of each poem. Both poets present the speaker differently through the use of poetic devices. For example, the metaphysical conceit in The Flea begins when the speaker states ‘And in this flea, our two bloods mingled be’. (4) This metaphor suggests that the speaker believes

    • 1546 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Poems The poems “To the Virgins to make much of time” ,“Valediction: Forbidding mourning” and “To His Coy mistress” are poems about love. A few of them I would have to say relate to a realistic view of love like the poems “To His Coy Mistress” and Valediction: Forbidding mourning”. How ever one poem doesn’t have realistic view of love like “to the virgins to make much of time”. There are multiple line that show this realistic view in love and there's some lines that oppose that it is a realistic

    • 806 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays