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Great Plains Essays

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    Great Plains Daily Locust Attack: As harvest time is coming close, many farmers are preparing for it, drying out wheat and preparing cattle to be transferred. Everything was going well for the farmers of the Great Plains, they might even have a good season. Then, a large dark cloud appeared, covering the sun, locusts. Some say you could hear them before you saw them, their loud screeches being heard. Something wrong was going to happen, we just didn’t know it yet. Locust are covering everything,

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    the 1800’s. The railroad fueled the conflict with the Native Americans of the Plains, induced growth in population and economy in previously established urban areas, and lastly expanded the lands that were used for agriculture. The railroad affected various aspects of America’s West and the Great Plains. The advancement of the railroad West added to the already tense relationship with the Native Americans of the Plains. The government tried to avoid conflict with Natives by signing treaties with

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    Westward expansion resulted in Native Americans losing their native homelands and changing their culture to accommodate teachings from white settlers. Like the south, the West is a region wrapped in myths and stereotypes. The vast land west of the Mississippi River contains remarkable geographic extremes: majestic mountains, roaring rivers, searing deserts, sprawling grasslands, and dense forests. Since the first English settlers arrived at Jamestown in 1607, the story of America has been one of

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    A lot of nativedi nations lived on the Great Plains including the Sioux. The name Sioux comes from the sioun word “Nadowessi” which means little snake.The sioux indians originally came from Asia. These Native Americans lived in the territory of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and North and South Dakota etc. A Frenchman, moved into Sioux territory in the seventeenth century and took control of much of their land. The Sioux Indians were a powerful tribe with a rich history. The sioux

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    one tribe that had directly impacted the United States the most is this tribe, Chippewa, there are many things that are going to be reveal to learn why they were once enemies and now allies. It is known today that the regions of North America’s Great Lakes are homes to many American Indians and the group that had settled in these regions are called Algonquian (Ditchfield 5). This group of people were a very large

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    Loco: The Greek God

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    Loco is a god found in areas of Haiti, West Africa and the Caribbean Islands. He can also be referred to as the Patron of Healers and Plants, God of Trees, and Spirit of Vegetation. He may be called upon in Voodoo customs by priests and priestesses. Loco is a nature deity because he is thought to work with all kinds of plants, although he is generally connected with trees and their leaves which he provides properties of healing to, specifically the Kapok or Ceiba tree, also referred to as the Cheese

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    whites disrupted their surroundings. The Westward Expansion impacted the Native Americans land and culture. Before the Americans started coming to the West and settling, the Native Americans had a peaceful life. Twenty-eight tribes lived in the Great

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    distinctive due to their outrageous, unique styles of clothing and tattoos that adorned their bodies. Comanche: The Comanche tribe were located in the southern areas of the Great Plains. The Comanche tribe were renown as excellent horsemen. They fought against enemy tribes of Native Indians and rejected the Europeans ways of the Great Plains. Natural Environment: Mohave: The Mohave have lived for centuries in the valley of the Lower Colorado river, surrounded by desert. While the neighboring

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    The Comanche Indians

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    Indian or Tribal Nation, but they had great success in their early years working as groups or bands. But because a lack of a true unity for them in the beginning, despite their success, it became one of their greatest weaknesses. During the Spaniards occupation in the West and Southwest of America in the early eightieth century, the horse was introduced to America and to the American Indians. Groups or Band of Shoshoni Indians broke away and moved into the plains of the United States, Colorado, Kansas

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    Ethan Shevin Mr. Henderson U.S History 10/22/2015 Lingua Franca between the Native Americans and the Europeans In the 16th century, Europeans arrived onto the “New World”. This side of the World had never been discovered and was completely unknown according to the Europeans. This undiscovered world was soon to be colonized by the foreigners, but there was one discovery that interested and put perspective into the new comers. This discovery was human civilization on this land. These

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    move to the Great Plains. This act stated that “any citizen of the U.S could claim 160 acres of government land”, however they had to pay a small fee. After paying the homesteaders had to improve their land by living on the land, building a home, and planting crops. If the settlers did those things and stayed on their land for five years, the land became their property. With the homestead act about 270 million acres of land was available for people to live on. That must sound great cheap land

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    The Ponca Tribe

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    lower 48 states are the Great Plains American tribes, these tribes live in a region where there are few trees with valleys and rolling hills. This is where the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma as well as many other tribes resides in. With quite a dearth tribe, their highest population being 3,522 present day, but although they weren’t large they are known for their abounding cultural tradition and past. The Ponca tribe of Oklahoma had a mixed culture of the Middle Mississippi and Plains people. They were Siouan

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    merged with the Shoshone tribe in the Upper reaches of the Platte River. Only when the Europeans arrived did they split up. Around 1700 the Comanches acquired horses and started moving south from the Shoshone tribe. They made a stop in the Central plains before continuing on to an area that extended from the Arkansas River to Central Texas. As the tribe migrated south their population began to increase dramatically due to an abundance of food and an influx of Shoshone tribe members. The tribe itself

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    Plains People Essay

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    The First Nations aboriginal people have preoccupied the lands of the great plains as nomadic tribes for the past ten thousand years. These Plains people consist of several diverse groups such as the Blackfoot, Cree, Assiniboine, Sarcee, and Ojibwa. Their dwelling places expands from the prairie provinces of Saskatchewan, Alberta, and Manitoba all the way down in the south-central parts of the United States which include states such as Texas, the Dakota’s, and Oklahoma. Within these numerous tribes

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    Both stories begin with a higher being, called the Great Earth Mother by the Algonquins and the Great Spirit by the Comanches. In both stories, there are good and evil forces. Both creation myths also tell of the evil force being cast into an underworld where they continue to torment the living. In each story, the evil forces

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    Gilded Age

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    unskilled workers were also restricted. In 1885 a law was passed prohibiting contracted labor workers. Along with push + pull factors; Religious persecution, poverty, overcrowding, political and religious freedom, economic opportunities in the great plains and industrial jobs in the cities. Slums were a way to describe urban life in the northern cities. Wealth flowed during the 18-1900’s but only to the upper class of society. City life was overcrowded and unsanitary. Many immigrants took native

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    mammals, forcing hunting bands to intensify their hunting” (Faragher pg 8). After the end of the Ice Age large mammals, like mastodon died off, because of the climate change. They began hunting bison with weapons that could be thrown quickly with great accuracy and speed. The retreat of the glaciers led to new ways of getting food: hunting-arctic, foraging-desert, fishing-coasts, and hunter-gatherer-forests. In the desert food was obtained through small game hunting and intensified foraging. Native

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    individuals, however a branch, the supposed Plains Cree, were wild ox seekers. The Cree's first experience with white individuals was in 1640, the French Jesuits. The Cree Indians later lost a large number of their tribe in the 1776 break out of little pox, fights with the Sioux, and a thrashing to the Blackfeet in 1870. The Cree lived by chasing, angling, catching, and utilizing muskrat as one of their staples. They made penances to the sun; the Great Master of Life. 1. The Cree are Canada's biggest

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    when they’re in this horrible trouble”(Wilde 68). While it may not be his true name, Jack fits Ernest characteristics just as well when Jack takes his chance to talk to Gwendolen for her hand in marriage. Now, asking for someone's hand in marriage is great and all, but in Jack’s eyes, you don’t mention something as “small” as having a ward at your country home, which may cause a problem. When Algernon asks if he’d said anything, his only excuse was that “the truth isn’t quite the sort of thing one tells

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    Sioux Tribe

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    alive, the Sioux practiced oral tradition in sharing their past, through the Siouan language and occasionally, they communicated through sign language. They were a dominant tribe in Minnesota that later migrated continuously through the northern Great Plains region following buffalo patterns. The Sioux depended on bison for most of their food source, clothing, and shelter. They

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