Sovereignty Essays

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    Singapore is a sovereign state. Sovereignty is defined as the quality or state of being sovereign, or having absolute independence and power such as authority. (Dictionary.com, n.d) Additionally, a sovereign state such as Singapore can be represented as an independent nation, having full control and autonomy over its regulations and decisions within its territories. There is a great deal of challenges relating to sovereignty due to the ongoing process of globalization. However there are three challenges

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    international pressure to abide by commitments to human rights and the right to life. This has constitute tensions in an international law system, Humanitarian intervention as the justifiable act to intervene while it is contrary to the principle of sovereignty and nonintervention in the UN system and international law. An evolving international norms related to human rights and the use of force. The authorized intervention was granted by UN Security Council. Chapter VII of the Charter also provides

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    the centralized belief is that the federal government of the United State, along with state and local governments, are illegitimate and hold no control or authority (FBI's Counterterrorism Analysis Section, 2013). One pro-sovereign site states sovereignty as “having supreme dominion over your realm – That you are the king of your own territory and governed by the law of God, not the laws of bankrupt corporations [states] and their security guards [law enforcement]” (Sovereign Authority , 2014). Evident

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    International Law, jurisdiction is related to the concept of sovereignty and territory. In order to become a state, it must have territory and when a state has territory it is sovereign; and sovereign means it has supreme authority within its territory and is politically and legally independent with power to affect people, property and circumstances within its territory. Jurisdiction on people and property is an important and crucial part of state sovereignty. According to Shaw, jurisdiction is concerning about

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    The novel “Founding Brothers” is written by Joseph J. Ellis, an American history professor at Mount Holyoke College. Ellis is a nationally recognized scholar of American history from colonial times through the early periods of the Republic. Furthermore, Ellis is the author of seven books and is also a recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for his book Founding Brothers. Having read the book Founding Brothers it is found Ellis educates his readers on numerous critical issues while exploring many evocative

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    Oppression is often portrayed in a negative light. Those who fight oppression are frequently regarded as heroes. The opposite is true for Alan Moore and David Lloyd’s book, V for Vendetta. V for Vendetta totes a mysterious character who goes by the alias of V. V is a villain who will stop at nothing to achieve his end goal: freeing England from the Norsefire regime. Many would see V as a hero due to the fact that he is trying to free a country and its civilians from an oppressive government. Majority

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    An important role is carried out by the criminal justice system in a democratic society. My philosophy and approach for balancing individual rights and public protection is that law enforcement authorities should restrict citizens’ liberties through force to compel obedience of law if those liberties cause harm to the society. Authorities maintain law and order by restricting freedoms of the citizens through force to constrain them to obey the law penalizing those who disobey the law. However, the

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    Foucault Power

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    bringing into play the role of power relations does not exclude the use of violence any more than it does the obtaining of consent; no doubt the exercise of power can never do without one or the other, often both at the same time” (p789).It highlights how power is most definitely not the opposite of violence and where power is exercised, sometimes so is violence. In his argument it is important to note that , for a nation to exercise authority, it has to be possible that there were initially choices

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    Even though Philip II and Louis XIV were both absolute monarchs, they were still very different types of rulers with similarities and differences. Philip II and Louis XIV were absolute monarchs who believed that they should have supreme power over everyone. In addition to this similarity, they both loved art and control over territory shown by the way they prioritized it. While they both share a love for power and art, they do not share a love for each other’s lifestyles. Louis XIV lived a lavish

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    Why Is Uk Uncodified

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    The UK’s constitution, once revered as the matchless constitution , has come under scrutiny in regards to whether the recent constitutional system that it holds is the best way to govern a country. The definition of a constitution can be stated as a “whole system of government of a country, the collection of rules which establish and regulate or govern the government” . The UK’s constitution is identified as an unwritten constitution, though not to be taken literally as the constitutional laws

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    We all know that the necessity of peacekeeping and the importance of sound legal justification for the employment of use of force has been a key issue in international law since the days of Grotius and his “Just War” doctrine. Increasing interdependency of states and the authority the United Nations Charter and Security Council results in a complex system of law where the legality of use of force depends as much on defensibility of the act as it does on the rules of international law governing use

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    Privilege Of Immigration

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    cultures, as immigrants continue to shape the comprehensive American culture. Yet, despite all the positives of immigration, it is not a human right, but rather a privilege. This is not to advocate for a ban on immigration, but rather to support the sovereignty of

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    TRUE SENSE OF INTERNATIONAL LAW: The controversy whether international law is a law or not resolves on the divergent definitions of the word “law” given by the jurist. If we subscribe to the view of Hobbes, Austin and Pufendorf, that law is a command of sovereign enforced by a superior political authority then international law cannot be included in the category of law. On the other hand if, we subscribe to the view that the term“law”cannot be limited to rules enacted by superior political authority

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    The idea of who I think I am cannot be explained without considering about something called identity. Identity, according to the dictionary definition, is the fact of being who or what a person or thing is. However, in the field of International Politics, conceptualising identity is the subject of long standing debate. Thus there are a plethora of different ways of thinking about identity and the markers used to signify it and they have their limitations. Identity, in this field, is largely seen

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    Act Of Violence In Hamlet

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    William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark has many deaths in it, emphasizing the title’s claim as a tragedy. Most of the deaths in the play can be traced to a certain act of violence. Any given act of violence in this play has a meaning attached to it. The main act of violence that starts the chain of events to bring about the end of the play is when Prince Hamlet stabs Polonius. Polonius was spying on a meeting between Hamlet and the Queen to measure Hamlet’s sanity and to see

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    how wrong are his superiors ensuring that he does not stay upstairs in their furnished apartment? Of course he prefers the dungeon or bush where his true identity as a mischief-maker is hidden and temporarily ignored by the lords and ladies of honour he is serving. The "dry cellar" home of black skinned chanters gives a similar but not exact impression as the "waste-land" of characters like Marie and her uncle, Gerontion, and a middle-aged financier Alfred Prufrock. These human figures are drawn

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    Martin Luther King discusses many philosophical principles in the “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” that relates with Aquinas discussion about law. Most of Martin Luther King’s philosophical ideas have to deal with natural law. According to Aquinas natural law is promulgated by reason and also rational participation in the eternal law. But in “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” we can see how human law is connected to natural law always. The two philosophical principles I find most interesting that Martin

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    The great Dome of Santa Maria del Fiore, erected by Filippo Brunelleschi remains one of the wonders of Renaissance architecture. Along with the Cathedral’s dome, Brunelleschi was known for his magnificent inventions and arcthecural designs. In the process of marking his legacy, Brunelleschi was challenged socially and politically by rival artist and patrons of his time. Despite countless obstacles, Brunelleschi was a man that thrives in challenging situations. The secretive nature of Brunelleschi

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    Back in the middle ages castles were popular structural buildings used to hold empires. There were many types of castles designed and built of which some grander and greater than others. But overall they all had the same purpose which was to protect the king, his court and his kingdom. The Windsor castle A Bailey and Motte castle is a castle which is built out of wood or stone keep and is on a raised earth mound which is called a motte. It would then have a bailey or enclosed court yard which was

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    An issue in theoretical basis on what should prevail or which is supreme between International Law or Municipal Law (national law) is usually presented as a competition between monism and dualist. But in modern approach there is now the theory of coordination or is also called Harmonization theory that rejects the presumption of the other two theoretical concept, monism and dualism. The monist view asserts the international law’s supremacy over the municipal law even in matters within the internal

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