Animal Farm: An Allegory To The Russian Revolution

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The book Animal Farm, by George Orwell is an allegory to the Russian Revolution. There are direct correspondence within the characters and the situations. The animals in Animal Farm are contrasted to the people in the Russian Revolution. As well as the people, almost all of the events in the Russian Revolution were related to the events that happened in the book. The characters in the story have many similarities and but also have some differences. Old major has connections to both Marx and Lenin. Marx wrote The Communist manifesto in 1848, this is paralleled in the book in the first chapter when old major tells his great ideas for all animal equality. Old major says that humans were the real enemy of the world, just like how Marx discussed…show more content…
Jones. Mr. Jones represents Nicholas II because both of them did not take good care of their “people”. He was almost always drunk, extremely cruel to the animals, and was overall incompetent. Because of how Mr. Jones treated the animals, they started the revolution. Nicholas II and his family were executed in the Russian Revolution. This is shown in Animal Farm by all the animals’ destruction of Jones’s tool. Napoleon is another character that has similarities to the revolution. He was representing Stalin, which they are both almost identical. Both had a great thirst for power and bloodshed. Stalin got rid of any opposition to his reign. In Animal Farm, Napoleon did the same. Both Stalin and Napoleon also liked to bend the truth, manipulating the media and information in their societies. Just like how Napoleon tried to hide his farm the farms lack of food to other farmers, the same way Stalin tried to hide that his country was in a massive famine. The sheep played a big role in the book. They represented the wave of propaganda during the Russian Revolution and other people who blindly followed Stalin. The chant “Four legs, two legs bad”, move them that they use it anywhere and whenever they get a chance to say it. The Russian people followed Stalin and his propaganda, much like a herd of
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