Comparing Rhetorical Devices: JFK And George W. Bush

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Gabriella Hoeppner Mrs. Mueller English 10 Period 2 February 2023 Writing to Compare Rhetorical Devices: JFK and George W. Bush A quote from Dalai Lama says “Our world and our lives have become increasingly interdependent, so when our neighbor is harmed, it affects us too. Therefore we have to abandon outdated notions of 'them' and 'us' and think of our world much more in terms of a great 'US', a greater human family.” Dalai is trying to portray peace and unity as much as Kennedy and Bush are. Peace is a really big moral for a lot of people and it helps create stronger bonds between them. Without peace, it would be hard to achieve certain levels of trust, cooperation, and inclusiveness for societies to be united and resilient. In 2001 when …show more content…

Bush addressed the entire country for the first time as president. Many people tuned in to either hear or watch him give his address. Bush uses biblical allusions, anaphora, and repetition to be able to give an effective speech that will be remembered by many. Bush uses biblical references to appeal mostly to the religious community who were listening to or watching his speech. George uses his first biblical allusion when he says, “I know this is in our reach because we are guided by a power larger than ourselves, who creates us equal, in His image…” (Bush 2). He uses these allusions to God to feel closer to those who believe in Him. Throughout his speech, Bush tries to convey the message that he understands the people of America. This can positively impact the audience because they know that he is standing right by them on the same page. George also uses anaphora in order to unite the nation. After talking about the nation’s differences and how they aren’t accepted, Bush says, “A story we continue but whose end we will not see. It is a story of a new world that became a friend and liberator of the old, the story of a slaveholding society that became a servant of freedom, the story of a power that went into the world to protect but not possess…” (Bush 1). He repeats “story” to show that everyone is making an impact on the world for the better even though we may not be around to see how it plays out. Our story is …show more content…

Bush’s was given by John F. Kennedy. Kennedy was a very powerful president and he set a great precedent for future presidents. Kennedy’s inaugural address was powerful and changed a lot of people. Likewise to George’s address, Kennedy also used biblical allusions, anaphora, and repetition by voicing a message that many people needed to hear. Similarly to Bush, Kennedy also used biblical allusions to unite the people and give them the strength and hope that they may need. He is also able to effectively communicate his ideas to the people of America to portray world peace. At the end of his address, although not the first time, JFK brings up God by saying: “With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on earth God’s work must truly be our own.” (Kennedy 28). Kennedy portrays his religious beliefs by appealing to both pathos because, in times of desperation, people look to God for guidance and help, and ethos, because God is a trusted ideal that many people rely on. JFK uses anaphora in a similar way that Bush does by helping to incorporate the people to see what he is seeing. Throughout most of his address, he says phrases like “To those… these people… these places… to those old allies… to our…” to show that the nation will pledge to help those that are in need. He uses anaphora to

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