Cultural Differences In American Culture

814 Words4 Pages
Language’s Disconnection Between Cultures and Individuals
Language can be defined as the recipe for human communication through verbal, and nonverbal techniques. Our use of language emerges from interactions between one another, giving uniqueness to the multitude of cultures that exist. Generations are detached from each other as the result of not only cultural differences, but through dialects, idioms, and slang. Simultaneously, language can be simple and complex, giving us a vast understanding of what separates us as cultures and individuals. The language we use creates a barrier between separate cultures and exposes our personal identity as demonstrated through Mother Tongue, Slang in America and The F Word.
The use of language can effortlessly
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Dumas initially starts with her family 's names, their meaning and how they were mocked once they moved to America. Your name defines who you are, and gives you a sense of pride for who you are. But when even your name is made fun of you feel disconnected from yourself, and the new culture you are entering. “All of us immigrants knew that moving to America would be fraught with challenges, but none of us thought that our names would be such an obstacle,” (Dumas). She describes the difficulties they knew they would face in the cultural differences between Iran and America, but was distraught from the contrast in language in America and how it separates their cultures. Dumas’ name eventually got in the when she attempted to gain a job. Even after graduating with honors from UC-Berkeley, she was constantly rejected for three months straight. She retained the idea of using her Americanized name, “I added ‘Julie’ to my resume. Call it coincidence, but the job offers started coming in,” (Dumas). This demonstrates the language differences between Iran and American cultures that help detach the cultures ever more so. Names are personal to you, and define who you are as an individual, but even our names are based on the language of our
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