Essay On Flappers In The 1920s

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The roaring twenties was a time when the nation's wealth doubled between the years 1920 to 1929. Men and women celebrated this time by enjoying parties and gatherings every so often. Women also were ecstatic since they were able to vote due to the 18th amendment. However, since the economic growth there were many conflicts rather than celebration.
Women at this time had many advantages, they were becoming free. Now they were able to vote which was a good turning point for them. Birth control was becoming more available for them as well, which meant fewer children. Although women had many rights in the 1920s many were identified as a sexual icon, the “flapper”. Flappers were described as outspoken, unladylike, free spirited, females. These women drank, smoked, wore short dresses and had a bobbed hair style.
Jazz was a big hit during the 1920s. With songs like “Nothing could be better”, ‘Love me”, and “Baby” and with dances like the Charleston, the flea hop, and the black bottom everyone was enjoying themselves. The first radio station hit the air in 1920 in Pittsburgh. Since money wasn’t an issue during this time, many households owned radios. Music was a big part of life during this generation. During the 1920s money was raising which meant extra valuables. Everyone owned radios and half owned cars. Cars were the
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Gangsters like Al Capone, Bonnie and Clyde and John Dillinger were taking over big cities. Prohibition was the main cause of organized crime in 1920. Many people were upset about the decision to ban alcohol. Unemployment was at its high and everyone was trying to make a quick buck. Americans turned to crime and the illegal merchandising of alcohol. False books and waist flask were used to stash any type of alcohol. Bribing of government officials was very common and always a sure thing. Eventually the government gave up, after seeing so much crime and deaths they decided to demolished the prohibition of

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