Higgins And Pickering Implications In George Shaw's Pygmalion

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George B. Shaw describes how Higgins and Pickering treat Eliza as if she were a doll, dressing her and playing around with her. It’s comical, they don’t understand that the “experiment” is truly funny to watch progress if you know what is going on, two grown men teaching a flower girl to be a duchess. As a reader, you notice how every time Mrs. Pearce or Mrs. Higgins would ask the two men what their plans with Eliza would be after they’re done with her, neither of them give an answer, they simply talk over her and don’t pay much attention to what the outcome may be. When they talk of Eliza and her progress throughout her lessons, they don’t speak of her as if she is a person, they seem infatuated with her because she’s simply more amazing than they imagined she would be. When Mrs. Higgins says the two men treat Eliza as if she were a “live doll”, she is right because aside from Pickering, although Pickering & Higgins are working together to reinvent Eliza, Higgins is the one who only cares about her appearance and her transformation. In the play, Pygmalion, by George B. Shaw, the author presents Higgins and Pickering as two babies playing with their doll which is wrong because…show more content…
Shaw presents Higgins and Pickering as two babies playing with Eliza as if she were a live doll. While Higgins actions towards Eliza are disrespectful, it also shows how Eliza handles the treatment, how it bettered her views on others. Eliza is a ‘common flower girl’ but appears as a duchess and throughout the story, Higgins explains that he does not treat Eliza poorly because she is a lower class, he does not state why he treats her this way. Eliza & Higgins always bud heads, and no matter what, Higgins has admitted that he will not change the way he is to please Eliza. Higgins trained Eliza to be a lady, & along the way Eliza learned that no matter what class you’re from, respect isn’t always a given. In the end, Higgins was still that baby with his

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