How Does Piggy Change In Lord Of The Flies

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In William Golding’s book, Lord of the Flies, Piggy shows a great change from the beginning of the novel to the end, as he becomes much more confident leader of the boys. Piggy first demonstrates this new aura of confidence with his newly found ability to voice his opinions with matters that are important to him. Towards the end of chapter 2, Piggy takes the conch from Ralph to speak, as he feels like he needs to express his opinions. In this scene, Piggy remains quiet at the beginning of the meeting of the boys, showing that he is reserved, yet by the end he has warmed up to the group and voiced his opinions towards them. Piggy explains that they need to accept the reality that they may never get off of the island, and that they must learn …show more content…

The matureness of his words made his somber message very hard to deliver, as the other boys would be shocked in despair with the idea of never leaving, and the boys would presumably be furious with Piggy for suggesting the idea . Later in the book, after Piggy’s glasses are stolen by Jack, Piggy confesses to Ralph that they must get the glasses back by confronting Jack. Jack, who is the “bully of the island”, is very intimidating to be around because he is excessively rude and extremely aggressive. Piggy continues to say to Ralph that they must look “…like we used to, washed and hair brushed…” (155), as he feels it is important to look nice to be taken seriously. Finally, after the signal fire goes out, Piggy decides to problem solve by having the signal on the beach instead of on the mountain: this …show more content…

For example, Piggy takes charge at the firs meeting of the boys to exclaim that they must build shelters and that a signal fire should be used in case a ship passes by the deserted island. Piggy has taken over as a leader of the group, even though he by no means has to. He feels that survival is the most important idea in their lives and all of the boys need know that. By making shelters and lighting a fire, the boys follow Piggy’s ideas of survival. Later, Piggy, at an assembly, demands that a littlun be allowed to speak when he quietly tries to express his opinion. When the boy is too shy to speak to the general crowd, Piggy responds by saying “Let him have the conch!” (42). Piggy even “listens and interprets” (42) his ideas for him to the rest of the boys. He feels that all of the boys need a chance to be heard, even those who are too shy to talk. Piggy shows his role model qualities in the group by helping the shy littlun talk, as not a single boy was going to let him voice his opinions. In chapter 3, the older boys decided to ditch Piggy to go hunting; leaving him to watch over the littluns building the shelters. Piggy was originally very upset, but he very quickly toughens up to be optimistic towards the littluns when no one was watching or forcing him to. Piggy could have left the littluns to go hunting, yet he takes on an unassigned responsibility

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