Instill Paranoia In George Orwell's '1984'

1387 Words6 Pages
From Orwell’s novel, “1984”, it can be determined that his opinion on the most powerful means of control by the government would be the government’s use of fear to instill paranoia among the people. One powerful piece of corroboration for fear to paranoia would be Oceania’s obvious, and constant, use of technology to fulfill this goal. Take, for instance, the telescreens. Because of their existence in every buildings’ rooms and corners, they can be easily used to keep an eye on party members, and if need be, used to track their location and arrest them. Winston experiences the surveillance inflicted by the government during one of his daily workouts,as right when he stopped trying in order to ponder the conspiracies surrounding the party,…show more content…
However, it is not to be said that the mics would alone work to capture rebels, but instead increase chances of said rebels being incarcerated. Julia is caught by the telescreens eventually, after all, and so it would only be sooner or later that rebels would be captured. In conclusion, by using telescreens and mics to monitor the people, the government is able to effectively prevent them from engaging in revolutionary actions and getting away with it, thus spreading a fear to take action among the people. Yet another potent example of fear to instill paranoia by Big Brother is the use of police. One such occurrence lies on the integration of children into Oceania’s “police” force, as in they would be used to spy on their very own family members. The effectiveness of said integration is demonstrated through the Parsons’ family, in which Mr. Parsons, who is very fond of his children and them fond of him, is turned in by them for chanting “down with Big Brother”. He reveals this to Winston when he is thrown into the same jail cell in the Ministry of Love. Parsons speaks of his daughter, explaining that “she listened in the keyhole, heard what I was saying, and nipped off to the patrols the very next day (Orwell 300)”. It is
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