Trauma Exposure Theory

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The topic of chronic offender concept this is where crime starts at an early age. Siegel states that relatively few offenders become chronic criminals perhaps chronic offenders possess some individual trait that is responsible for their behavior (2014). This makes me think of how trauma plays a role in how a brain develops and the damage it does to the part of the brain that makes decisions. I believe that if the trauma exposure theory is applied to the offenders when they begin to commit crime at an early age there could be prevention for chronic behavior. Then a Chronic offender could very well be just an offender. it seems to me that there is a mental health malfunction that the system is overlooking because they don't care. However, Siegel…show more content…
Tough (2008) then fills in the details to this rare one-of-a-kind program. Canada developed the program from the idea in order to move the children out of the poverty he had to start early. After becoming frustrated with the low success rate and the small number of people he could help at one time, he began to do some research. He looked at all the different ways that middle-class children developed and what they were being exposed to in the home. He reviewed all of the new Baby Einstein programs and how stimulating vocabulary and how reading to a child at an early age was comparing to not reading to them and teaching them positive words rather than negative words help their minds to develop. He used all of these theories in developing a program that he called baby college. later turned into a conveyor belt program which had children working through from birth to graduation. They would start before birth then into all-day kindergarten and into programs that most kids in Harlem would not be eligible for. As time went on Canada was able to have the children take their first placement test into the education program the children of the baby college program scored higher or above that of the kids who were not in the baby college program. Their reading levels and math levels were either higher or at same…show more content…
This is hard for me to wrap my mind around because in more States than not felons can vote and have been able to vote according to Matthew green (2016) only 2.5% of the voting population is disenfranchised. In Washington state inmates and people on probation for felony crimes cannot vote. Once they are off probation they can vote the other term I'm having a hard time with when talking on this matter is the term ex-felon. There is no such thing as an ex-felon. The jacket of fill-in is worn forever. That's like saying I'm an ex mother or an ex father. It's forever. I had to state my feelings about that. with that said I strongly believe that those states that do disenfranchised people, do like to keep the system in place. States like Alabama are still very much controlled by white upper class and the mass majority of felons are black and of poor lower economic status. I must add that a convicted felon is the only person that can legally be discriminated against, so using disenfranchisation is a way to keep the civil rights away from poor African-Americans, and a slick trick used to get away with it. This ensures those who have the power retain the
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