Felon Disenfranchisement Essay

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Felon disenfranchisement is not only unconstitutional but also further institutionalizes racism. For example, in communities consisting of minorities like African Americans and Hispanics felony disenfranchisement unlawfully create a disadvantage for freedom of speech. As stated by Eric H. Holder, JD a US Attorney General “although well over a century has passed since post-Reconstruction …the impact of felony disenfranchisement on modern communities of color remains both disproportionate and unacceptable.” The act of taking away someone’s right to vote notably mirrors the act of forbidding African Americans to vote during the post-Reconstruction Era. Holder refers to the fact that taking away the right to vote essentially withdraws any opinions that minorities…show more content…
Moreover, The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Rutgers Law School Constitutional Litigation Clinic have stated that “of the approximately 100,000 parolees and probationers subject to the state 's felon-disfranchisement law, more than 60 percent are African American or Latino, which the ACLU and Rutgers say is in large measure a consequence of racial profiling in the criminal justice system.” Inclusive to what The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Rutgers Law School Constitutional Litigation Clinic have stated, minorities like African American or Latino have been disenfranchised because of racial profiling. The fact that minorities are losing their voice and fundamental right show cases the fact that disenfranchise further institutionalizes racism in the U.S.. Therefore as a progressive nation, disenfranchisement should not be allowed because it promotes racism. Overall ex-convicts should be allowed to vote because post-incarceration voting restrictions are a violation of universally accepted human rights standards and disproportionately excludes
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